Ever since we placed our mother in a memory care facility she has declined more than 25%. We're thinking of taking her out and putting her back in her own home. Is this a good idea?

Follow
Share

We placed my mother in a memory care facility in South Florida that is closer to my sister in August of 2010. She has declined more than 25% since that time and we (siblings) are thinking of taking her out and putting her back into her own home in Lady Lake, Florida with 24/7 care. We would like to know if this is a good idea and where we can find trustting and experienced caregivers in this area.

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Find Care & Housing
15

Answers

Show:
without reading the other posts yet. I know when you move a person with Alz. (think about how you feel, if you are on vacation and awake not knowing exactly where you are for a few seconds) it takes a while for them to adjust. They need to adjust to the new surroundings. Then there is medication adjustments and the disease itself progression. All these things need to be taken in to account before you blame the facility. If it is an abusive or a neglect of care situation there are resources to voice your concerns. There should be rights of residents form you should have gotten upon admittance.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

And I do have power of att.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

my mom in in a nursing home and she say she stays hungry, I have taken care of my mom for the pas 7 years, and being there here clothes is not being returned , I know do her laundry but she has been there for a month and her clothes has not been back, she has dementia other that that she is ok but getting back to the clothes they put clothes on her that is not here, and I leave notes that she like a bra on everday and I have it posted, but when I go there no bra please help with an ans on what to do..asap
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Absolutely, get her out of there, poor thing. If you ever talked to a daycare facility many many of them had been in nursing homes and they take them out. My Moms with me and she will enver go into one, she is in late stage dementia/alz and needs 24hr care, its NOT easy but doable. You can use your Moms money for care or medicaid if she has none. You can go on sittercity.com or care.com or ask the daycares for people. She will be SO happy, who wouldnt want to be in their own home? They will never get the care they deserve in a nursing home, I dont care what anyone says, home is best. Good Luck and we are here to support you all the way with ideas.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

a nursing home is not always a good idea, i know i work in one and some of the nurses and be completely ignorant and not care as long as they're getting paid and everything seems to be falling inline. I think that it'll be a bit stressful for you at frst but everything takes sometime to adjust everyone knows that i personally would not put my mother/ father in a home because i know how they can be but if you would feel safer i think it would be a great idea to bring her home she's probably miserable anyway.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

kimmer132003 - There is an article in the LATimes today that
may be of interest to you
Taking care of Mom -- and all of her finances too
Hope this helps.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Depending on the level of memory loss it may appear that she is declining but the reality is that once she is no longer in her former environment she is functioning at her true level. Mom was able to appear higher functioning because she was familiar with her surroundings.
I would also look at the facility more closely- does it meet moms current needs? Does it provide for and include her in to stimulating activities? Do they provide for familiar and comforting food? Is there too much stimulation where she feels overwhelmed? What is the ratio of aides to assist per person? Are they hurrying her through her dressing, grooming and eating? Does she feel safe? What memory level are the other occupants on her floor? If many are more impaired it may be depressing for her and make her feel hopeless. Know that all ALF's are not equal and that she may receive/need more one on one at a smaller facility. Moving mom home should not be up to the doc- some over magnify the situation and others may feel that it's a good move but the ultimate decision is yours. I did the 24/7 care for Mom but I also had mom in my home so I could supervise her care and her caregivers. Remember, if no one but an aide is living with her you will be at that persons mercy especially if mom develops some challenging behaviors. Make sure you do your own back ground check on that person that goes across all state lines.
God bless
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

In reality, no facility will ever replace the home environment. It just stands to reason that a small staff cannot take care of the physical, emotional, and spiritual needs of all their patients....so care suffers, even in the best facilities.
My Mom is still in her own place - with lots of help from us and some paid caregiving. That will increase over time. My plan is to utilize in-home care for as long as possible. That way, Mom can stay in her home (her wish), feel more independent, and not have to get used to unfamiliar surroundings. Most of us have been to care facilities and most of us would not want to spend more than a few hours visiting - can you imagine living there? Also, the horror stories of misdiagnosis and over-medication makes me think that these are modern-day dumping grounds for unwanted family members. (this is happening in my own family.)
I hope you read through many of the threads on this site - you will get so many points of view here.
I wish you good luck in finding the right placement for your Mom.
Lilli
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

I have heard this many times, depression sets in and they lose their zest to thrive. Of course home is best, if someone will do it. I know I wouldnt want to be put in a home for my last days, but sometimes it cant be helped. Good luck, its tough, I am going thru it here with mom, but I will keep her till the end.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I believe so. I was advised by doctors (and a sister in law who is a nurse) to take a number of medications that basically kept me "out of touch"....I decided I didn't like the affect it had on my life ..so I stopped taking the meds...its been almost 6 months and I feel like I'm more in control of my life, with support from my daughters who r paying my utility bills while I'm waiting to collect my social security disability...my food stamp allowance has kept food on the table and I'm still in my home.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Related
Questions