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I feel you should wake them or at least check on them 2-3 times during the night. Have a monitor if they need help walking because they will try to get up and walk by themselves. I wouldn't want to sleep wet so treat them like you would want to be treated. Sleeping with two depends is a lazy way to not check on them. Just my opinion.
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Yes they do change and turn them every 2 hours at nursing homes and hospitals. If they get bed sores the nursing home ratings go down. I had my mom with me. The doctor told me to not wake her, that she needed to keep her sleeping patterns. I bought tena 2x diapers and 32oz booster pads to go in them on amazon. My mom would go 12+ hours a night fine and never got a bed sore in 8 years. I used vaseline mixed with 40% zinc desitin cream on her bum to keep out the wet. I cannot imagine being woken up either! changing them is one thing but getting them up is ridiculous.
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It's late at night in California. I just got a call from one of the staff at my aunts assisted living home in Oklahoma. She told me she was to call me every time my aunt refused to shower or "toilet". I asked her my aunt was asleep and was woke up for her shower. She said "yes mam, we wake her every 2 hours to toilet her and if she refuses to shower during the day we try every two hours at night." I'm in shock. What I learned is that their policy is to wake my aunt (or anyone else who is incontinent, get the out of bed and walk them to the brightly lit bathroom and check them for wetness. If she is wet they change her depends, if she is dry they put her on the toilet to see if she can "go". As per the staff, this happens every 2 hours, 24/7. So my aunt has not slept more than 2 hours for over a year when she became incontinent. I called some assisted living places near by to ask if this is a typical policy. I got different answers. One said they do check the incontinent residents every two hours but they try not to wake them or turn on bright lights and make it as quick as possible. They do not put them on the toilet. Another said they check 3 times per night. I can't imagine how awful it must be to be woken out of a dead sleep every two hours and taken to a bright room and put on a toilet. This sounds like something from a prison interrogation nightmare. I want to find a way to stop this treatment of my aunt but need some good advise as to how to go about speaking with the director in an kind and reasonable way rather than what I really want to say to her for allowing this. Please help.
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I work in a dementia unit. I personally think if the breif is wet let them sleep however if they have wet beyond the brief and they are laying in wet sheets and blankets their skin is compromised and they should be changed. Yes I agree they need their sleep but what quality is there to their sleep if cold and wet. We advocate for those who have no say. I would want to be warm and dry and I'm sure they would too.
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There are no absolutes when it comes to dementia...In my mother's case, we first ruled out UTI as a cause...then looked to ways to handle the newest problem encountered on her Alzheimer's journey. The problem was discussed with her PCP and neurologist. I decided to try the 3 AM bathroom call and it has worked with no adverse effects to mom's health or attitude. Never and Always are 2 words that can almost never be used with dementia care. Each journey is specific to the sufferer, however if you said NEVER let you mom run naked in the snow or always ensure your mom takes her medications, I would agree. That being said, I should have said, waking at 3 AM works for us, give it a try.
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Sleep is a BIG problem for all of us old folks. Some sleep six hours at night and nap for two hours. Others catnap all day long. Still others sleep a long eight-ten hours at one time. One thing for sure, no one should be told when to sleep and when to wake up except for meals and meds. Many will disagree with this theory, and they'll have their reasons, but at our age, we should be able to sleep when we want and for how long we want. Don't forget we put in many years in the workplace and at home as caregivers ourselves.
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I agree with N1, I talked to the internist and neuro on this and they said to not wake them up, that their sleep patterns were more inportant. I called a nursing home and they told me they wake them evey 2 hours, UGH! Poor things. My Mom will wake up herself sometimes if she wets , if not, I dont wake her and she has a wasit - down shower each morning, never had a rash. I also was told she needs 3 eight drinks a day and I get them all in before 4pm. She sleeps 10-12 hour nights and needs it with her Alzheimers. If she doesnt get it, she is miserable. I DO have to say thou, she had 2 negative urine cultures. When I went to the dr I asked for an antibiotic "please" because I felt the urine was much more than usual and concentrated. The Dr allowed this and my Mom is sleeping MUCH better now, and wetting less! She also started to make her bed mornings, and put her food in the fridge. She hasnt done this since her strokes last year. He now said she can STAY on antibiotics as a precaution and I am very happy about this. I do believe they have infections that dont show up, making them pee more and sleep less.
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I found this piece of information for you, and hope it is helpful:

Caregivers of dementia patients should understand that incontinence may be an inevitable part of the overall cognitive decline. As a person loses awareness of their surroundings, lifestyle, and loved ones, it is not surprising that loss of bodily functioning will also occur. It may be a tremendous source of frustration for both the caregiver and the patient. Communicating the incontinence issues early with the patient’s healthcare team can help reduce some of the frustration that the household may have with the issue. Even though it can be an uncomfortable subject, it is important that the full needs of the patient be addressed. The sooner incontinence is addressed, the quicker the patient and the caregiver can begin to work with options that may reduce the frustration or embarrassment that is involved.

As to what to do from this point--Can you contact a physician or neurologist for a professional opinion--as there is both pro and con on the subject, and I was just a caregiver for my Mom. You also might keep in mind, and is important, all cases are different and treated different-so what works for one, may not work for another...this my reason to contact a professional or the Alzheimer's Associaion, who deals with many types of dementia. A 24 Hr helpline # is (800)-272-3900.

Best~

Hap
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NO!! Never wake a patient up except for med giving. Place an Overnight Diaper on the patient and let her be!
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I do...I wake my mother (she has Alzheimer's type dementia) at 3 AM and walk her to the bathroom. She does her business and gets back in bed to sleep. Sleeping wet is not healthy. I use the Tena brand not Depends and they are great but they are not meant to spend 4 hours in wet. So yes, wake them and get them to a toilet...also, it took a while but I now get back to sleep quickly...and, let his/her primary care know about the incontinence, there may be a reason other than the dementia for the incontinence
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Yes, but being prepared is paramount! Waking someone from a deep sleep can have disasterous results if done too abruptly! There are night time 'depend' type products that will wick away moisture until the morning, and that may be easier, unless you are finding that the 'diaper' is not holding up.

Use BED PADS (two of them) and learn the proper way to 'roll' a person if need be. Have a 'bedside pottie' handy, so no long trips are necessary. Use aloe wipes for cleaning up, and WARM the wipe up before using, so there is no 'cold shock' to their sensitive skin.

Just imagine how you would feel if a stranger came into your bedroom inthe middle of the night, and decided to undress you!! Even if you think they know you they may NOT in the middle of the night. The best intentions can blow up in your face if not properly executed!

I'm sure there are others here that will share their experiences too!
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I did. Wet Depends can cause "Diaper Rash" or other skin breakdown.
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