My mom has short term memory loss that is getting progressive. What should I do?

Follow
Share

She gets very angry if I call her on things. My mothers mother had severe dementia, my mother made me promise that if she was every like that I had to tell her. Well, I told her. She was very angry. She sees a holistic dr. who prescribed vitamins for her memory loss.

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Find Care & Housing
18

Answers

Show:
Judy, my dad is 85 and has about 1 to 2 minute short term memory. You can't argue with him or correct him. We just listen, usually agree wit him, tell him what he needs to hear and keep moving. It's of absolutely no use to try and reason with him. If we do manage to convince him in one minute that he already got the paper he'll forget in the next minute. So another walk to the paper box won't hurt him or me. Just roll with it.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

My mother has stopped driving now after she ended up 70 miles away from our house, trying to drive to our house on Christmas Day!
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Dandey, Have the DMV give him a driving test....Tell them he needs to be evaluated. Lose the keys to the car. Have doctor deny his driving privledges. He doesn't need to be the cause of a bad accident, and you and your family don't need to be the cause of him losing his ability to drive.......Get him off the road. for everyone's safety..Look into your City drive. Senior citizen drive access......Taxi for seniors, etc....
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

In the UK, the only way to get on the ladder is to take them to the doctors first with their approval.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Yes I realise that, and she will be having another test in a few weeks at home. this was only a starting point.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Happy, the sort of mini mental that your mom was given doesn't really get to the crux of many dementias, which affect the ability to reason. She would need a full neuropsych workup for that.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

My mother is also having short term memory problems. In fact, it is starting to spread to long term. We took her for a dementia test to the doctor on Thursday. She got 28/30 for the questions! We were most suprised! However, 10 minutes after going to the doctors, she couldn't remember what she had been tested for and who she had gone with! The doctor mentioned that he will test her heart, as if there are problems with the heart, that can also effect the memory. I thought that was worth mentioning.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Just saw this article: impactaging/papers/v6/n9/full/100690.html
Maybe the holistic doc needs to read it and maybe this stuff might actually help.
But, this would be more for Alzheimer or mixed than vascular (stroke-related) dementias...

It is hard, but a huge part of dementia of any type is the fact that the person is losing reasoning ability, often first even more so than memory, and therefore becomes very unreasonable at times - so things they would have agreed to before as making perfect sense are out the window.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

Dandey6, a stroke can trigger the onset of dementia. These outbursts and uncharacteristic behaviors indicate that something is wrong. It might be something quite treatable, like a uti. It could be the beginning of dementia. The first step in dealing with it is to have him evaluated by a doctor. He may resist seeing a doctor and he probably doesn't think there is anything wrong with his behavior. But since he recently had a stroke, I am hoping you can convince him he needs his "two month post stroke checkup." Give the doctor a note about your concerns beforehand.
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

Judyberryman,
I noticed you said your mom was good with big things, but not many others. Are you relying on her word as to what she does and does not forget? That can be risky as her reports may not be accurate. She may have it on a calendar, but forget to check a calendar. Often the concept of the calendar is not fully appreciated.

If she is acting as you describe, it may be that she is not able to act on her own behalf. People with dementia often do not understand what you mean by the term. They don't believe it applies to them. They will often act in ways that are not in their own best interests. It's tough to handle, but there are ways around it. If that is the case, hurt feelings cannot prevent safeguards from being introduced.

It's nice you are so thoughtful of your mom's feelings. Normally, the memory gets much worse and the reasoning goes too. I have witnessed this firsthand. I would read a lot to find ways to handle her, if she progresses, because it's not usual for someone with AD or some other condition to think rationally and agree with your requests. They can be become hostile and resistant. I would have plan A and plan B to help her. If your dad is aware of this, he may be hesitant to upset her either.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Related
Questions