I am on the warranty deed of my mother's condo but not on the mortgage note. When my mother dies am I responsible for the mortgage?

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The mortgage on the condo is greater than its value. I don't have the money to pay the mortgage when the condo passes to me upon my mother's death. Since I'm on the warranty deed (not the mortgage note) can the mortgage company come after me if I decide not to pay the mortgage and "walk away"?

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can I just leave it the way it is in her name with bank keep paying the note and forget homestead tax for now
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Joyce, the mortgage company will want to be paid for their loan. Is there any way that the family could re-finance to pay off the note, and start fresh with a new mortgage?   Call the mortgage company and ask if the family can keep paying the loan.   Some companies will allow that, but others might have a clause saying payable upon death.

If you can't re-finance or keep pay the original loan, then try to sell the house as quickly as possible.   Do not do any repairs as there are enough Buyers out there who want houses to flip.   Get an appraisal from a licensed Appraisal to get an idea of how much the house is worth.   Call a Realtor, and make sure the house is being sold "as is".

Now since your names were already on the Deed when your Mom passed, you might need to pay capital gains taxes when you sell, if the value of the house has gone up a lot since when your Mom first bought the house.  That's the down size of putting the adult children's names on the Deed while a parent is still alive.

Otherwise, if you had inherited the house via a Will, then the cost bases of the house would be the day your received the house, not back when Mom had bought the house.

I know this becomes a crazy maze, and can get complex.  And some elders think if they leave the house to an adult child that the mortgage goes away upon death.   As we all know, that isn't how it works. 
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my mother passed away and her mortgage was in her name to get homestead tax credit we have to put it in our name since we were on the deed ,what happens to mortgage it was not in our name?
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my mother died 2006. The mortgage company knows she is deceased. I was behind in three payments but now have the back payment. Can they foreclose?
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I live in new jersey my mom died and has tw0 mortgages. Am I responsible for them. I am not sure she had a will.
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Is she out of compliance with the RM agreement? Like has she moved out of the house or something else (like she hasn't paid insurance or taxes)? Is there a reason why this is an issue right now? Is the loan being called?

Lots of older issued RM are now negative equity, like your mom's house is. The 2 big players in RM were Bank of American and Wells Fargo and they both got out of the RM game because the huge negative equity losses. You are not personally responsible for anything on the RM or any of your mom's debt, so this should not affect your credit rating. Unless you cosigned. Which hopefully you did not do?

More than 50% negative equity. Wow, there is probably no rebounding at that big of a %. If it were me, I'd put the keys with a tag of the address and mortgage account # into an envelope and Fed Ex them to the mortgage holder (so you have proof of doing this) and just walk away from it. Don't spend another cent on the house. If you mom is elderly and just on Social Security, there is nothing a debtor can attach for $ either. Could get ugly but really what can they do.....nothing.

You mention being her legal heir. So are you the one named to be executor as per her will after she dies? If that's the case, then as executor, you have to go to probate to deal with her estate. If the house still is an issue when that happens, then the house and it's debt are a part of her estate. If there are other assets in her estate (savings account, securities, etc), then you will have to liquidate those to pay off her debts in their order of importance as per the death or probate laws in her state. Funeral expenses usually come first then medical then mortgage. You really need a probate attorney to work with you on doing all this. Probate even when it's simple is pretty specific (rather than complicated) but requires notifications and filings to be done in a set timeframe and a good probate attorney is just worth it. Good luck and keep a sense of humor.
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My Mother has a reverse mortgage. The home is worth only about $50,000 at this time. She has used the reverse mortgage to about $118,000. I am her legal heir. What are my responsibilities to her mortgage responsibilities? Is bank foreclosure the best option being as she is upside down? How does this affect my financial status?
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Dodge - imho you need to see an attorney.

You have a # of issues here and beyond the mortgage...
1. Was mom competent at the time to sign over assets?
I ask this because if they did a quit claim deed for this, there can be problems as she did not own the property outright at the time (because she had an encumbrance on it by having a mortgage). So did she realize that? Even if they went to the courthouse and filed the QC there is no guaranteed ownership of the property with a QC. You can only get that by doing a warranty deed which needs a release of the deed of trust from the mortgage company to happen.

2. What does your mom's mortgage contract read about death of holder?
Mortgage company, auto dealership, credit card companies don't care who pays monthly. But paying the mortgage doesn't mean they own the property or even have a claim on the property. Most mortgage documents have a “due on transfer” clause. That means the old mortgage HAS TO BE paid off in full in order to transfer ownership. If it’s not being paid off in full and instead mortgage is being transferred to you, the lender can require you to qualify for the remainder of the mortgage, have the house appraised & other standard real estate items done when selling a home. If your credit history is iffy, this can be a problem. The house appraisal can often be a problem as so many, many homes are negative-equity to their mortgage (in other words the house is worth less than mortgage).

3. Did mom have a will and who is the executor for her estate and have they opened probate? If so, to whom did she name in the will for her properties. Was it the sibling who "owns" the properties now? The other children could challenge the transfer if this isn't the case.

Again all these things are sticky, you need an estate attorney.
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answers have been posted where?
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my mother passed and my youngest sibbling put three realestate propretys of hers in his name before she passed can he assume the morgages ?
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