Can I resign from work to take care of my elderly mother?

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Do you think it is alright to just resign from work so that I can take care of my elderly mother. At present, my work as a government employee is not enough. I plan to focus on my home-based business instead so I can keep an eye on my mother.

Answers 1 to 10 of 20
Alright ...anything is alright if you can swing it financially and emotionally. How much care does she require, can u focus on the home based business while she is there, will she be calling you every 10 minutes?
Top Answer
You might want to consider taking a leave of absence instead of resigning. Talk with the human resource department where you work to look into a "Family Medical Leave". You may have to do some work with her doctor to document that your mom needs your help in order to stay safely at home, but it may be beneficial for you to have a job to go back to if things don't go as smoothly as you are planning. Good luck.
In today's economy, I'd say be thankful and hold on to any job you have as well as look for other ways to take care of your elderly mother first.
TRY MAKING A LIST OF PROS AND CONS
WILL YOU BE LOSING YOUR PENSION
CAN YOU FINANCIALLY AFFORD TO STAY HOME
HOW MUCH CARE DOES YOUR MOTHER REQUIRE
IT SOUNDS AS IF YOU'D REALLY LIKE TO DO THIS, IF THE PROS WORK I'D SAY GO FOR IT, I'D LOVE TO STAY HOME AND CARE FOR MY MOTHER IF SHE NEEDED ME, GOOD LUCK
My parents are both elderly 85 and 82, they live in their own home in a retirerment community. Dad has numerous health issues hypertension, diabetes, lose of vision, however his mind is fine. My Mother on the other hand is very healthy except for osteoporosis and early dementia. I take them to the Dr and try to help them with out smothering them. I plan to take a leave from work when they need more care. I think most folks would rather have someone they know and love care for them.
I think it's wonderful that you've considered quitting your job and taking care of your mom. What you do have to consider is your job your chance to remain in touch with yourself? I also considered quitting and taking care of my mom but I've come to realize that caregiving is a huge task and my job gives me the chance to remain in touch with myself as a person. I agree that maybe a leave of absence might be a better option.

Our moms are really special people and we've been truly blessed have them in our lives.
Marissa,

I apologize for not reading your profile before I wrote my comment. I see you are a single mom and an only child who evidently has been taking care of mom since you were 20. My, my. You are definitely sandwiched between being a mother and a care giver for your mother.

In light of all that, the nice idea of quitting your job does not sound reasonable. Do you have Durable, Medical or Durable POA for your mother? If not, you need to get those by seeing an atty.

Your mother possibly qualifies for medicaid and the help it would pay for.
Check to see if Family Medical Leave (FMLA) is available from your work or state. Take a leave and see what "not working" (caregiving is work) is like. Remember that you must take care of yourself before you can take care of someone else (cliche but true). While "not working" investigate what goverrnment programs are available to your mother. In California there is In Home Support Services that will pay for some domestic, caregiving and supervisory services. Also remember that the economic climate now makes re-entering the workforce more diificult. Take your time, look at all options and scenarios, then choose what is best for BOTH you and your mom.
Wow such good answers...To me the first thing coming to mind is 'the family medical leave act' however depending on your employment situation-and the economy, I would check this out-but cautiously, as job security seems not what it use to be.

Good Luck!

Hap
I did exactly that on August 31, 2009. My dad is 93 years of age in pretty good health, but he was ill twice earlier in the year and I had a lot of trouble getting away from my job to be with him when he had a heart attack and later a pacemaker. I have not regretted it for one minute, however, we are very busy and he is very clingy. I am so thankful to be here to monitor him and be assured his meds are taken correctly and that he has a balanced meal with me every day and he never has to be alone again. This is the happiest time of my life.

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