Can a Power of Attorney refuse to allow family members to visit their mother who is competent and requesting visits?

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POA is one of the mother’s children.

She is currently living in one of her rental homes with the POA, his wife, adult granddaughter and her boyfriend. This was to be temporary while the mother received rehab. treatment. Treatment was completed months ago.

The mother wants to move back home and could with some limited daily help. She has requested the POA make it happen for months. No movement has been made by the POA.

After numerous requests by the mother's other sons the mother was allowed to visit and spend a weekend with one. For the first time in almost a year she was able to see all her other children, grandchildren and great grandchildren.

During that visit the mother slowly opened up and shared concerning facts about her treatment, and care while living with the POA's family. She asked to extend her visit and shared she was scarred to return to the POA, in fear of retaliation for sharing and not following all their rules while she was visiting.

The POA was contacted and when informed by his mother of her desire he refused to allow her to extend her stay. POA refused to bring her additional medicine so she could stay a few days longer. Advised he would block any efforts to secure additional medicine at the RX so that she could extend her stay... ETC.... to avoid arguing the mother eventually agreed to return to them (as she had several doctor visits for that week). It was agreed she would return to her other sons home for an extended visit in 3 days (after the doctor visits, the second son had offered to take his mother to the doctor visits but the POA refused).

When the day came for the return visit the POA refused to allow the visit. The POA has further refused that son from coming to visit or even to face to face check on his mother. A third son is also denied visitation. The POA will not allow either son to speak to mother on the phone.

The POA offers no reason for not allowing the visit; he just refuses it, stating he has the power and authority to do so.

POA advises mother is competent.

What action is appropiate?

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Hi - I don't think she legally has the power to do that unless it is written in the POA. She sounds very controlling. Who told you you did not have to go through her to take fil out on day trips? It would be a shame to deprive him of outings that he enjoys. On the other hand I am sure, in the interests of smooth family dynamics, that you don't want to get into a battle with her. Can her son, your husband, have a chat with her to try to sort it out? Can you ask the person who told you you did not have to go through her for day trips to be a go between? Do you have any idea why she is being so restrictive? Sounds like you and your hub have a great relationship with fil and she may be jealous.
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My mother in law is POA over my father-in-law whom she placed in a memory care section of a local home Aug.30,2016. We were told we didn't need to go thru her to take him out for day trips. We took him out for the day to our house for Thanksgiving & returned him by 830pm. We were given his meds for the day & times. We did as told. Couple of days later received a letter from mother in law stating we can only take him out with her permission & only 9am-5pm. This was not a letter drafted by a lawyer. Does she have the right to restrict our time with him & ask her for permission? We do try to visit every day as he's less than 8miles away. Since he was admitted we've only missed seeing him 16days due to wedding out of state for my brother. My husband did call & talk with his father every other day. I had left cards and notes for him that the staff gave to him on the days they didn't talk. The other 2 children dont visit other than the family friends picnic the home had back in Sept. My mother in law doesn't visit often. Sounds like every 10days or so. My father in law doesn't remember my name but he knows he likes me & knows I'm his sons wife so we are aware that he's slipping away. He seems to have enjoyed his car rides & when we bring him to our house.
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continue ... If the facility hold the power of attorney, not the son ?
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I have a assistant living facility and the son want the mother to stay at the facility, and feeling the brother will try to remove the mother. can a power of attorney prevent this from happen on the brother in.
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Can power of attorny be in place to stop family members from removing individual out of living facility
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continue refuels of a son to visit his mother is this unlawful
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I know this discussion thread in from 2011, and I logged on to read the stories long after my own debacle with a controlling brother with POA for our mother. Sadly, the only answer on how to avoid this mess is to be hyper vigilant on who takes care of an elderly parent, health wise and financially. Sometimes, a parent can be transfixed by a bullying member of the family who can upset the entire twilight years for mom or dad and rest of family. Undue influence, imprisoning, drugging them and putting them in terrible states of being are so common, my own story, that govt and state agencies usually will not get involved. Lawyers are so expensive, and never guarantee relief, mostly it gets worse after this due to legal wrangling, hearsay, lies by the controlling sibling, all because he has POA authority. All of the burden of proof is on the innocent family member(s) and if mom is frightened to speak up, there is no way to change the matters to simply protect a loved one. Mom has to be adamant that she wants change; if she can't do that as she has to be honest that her child has betrayed her, which is a difficult thing for any mother, she will and her loved ones will have to accept the situation. I know very well the sadness and powerlessness of trying to fight for my mom when she couldn't admit what her son was doing, it nearly destroyed me. I had to let it go. Thankfully I can still see her but not bring her to my home for dinner anymore or take her off of her nursing home grounds, or go to her Drs, or speak about her care with her care team. Live each day, love yourself and have your own life, believe you are a blessed child of a higher power that is with you thruout these trying times. Sometimes others journeys are just that, and we have to step back finally.
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I had a similar problem although my sister blocked ALL contact with my mother. Consulted CT APS who told me CT law favors your brother. Not so in other states however. Hired CT attorney who was going to take it before a judge and pursue a state conservatorship and out of the POA's care. Would have cost $30k for my sister to fight it in CT - which we figured she wouldn't because of cost. We managed to get my mother to FL where laws are stronger for the elderly and revoked my sister's POA, very reluctantly by my mother. We are going through a state guardianship in FL now as my mother has never been able to handle her own financial affairs and has short term memory loss (but not long term). The FL attorneys advise me the process is about $10-15k but reimbursable from her estate (living, not after her death). Consult a CT elder law attorney. Probably your only option with a crazy brother.
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OMG... We are living this same circumstance right know. Was there any resolution to yours.
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Sorry. I realized I repeated everything. Really just need to know how good / reliable CT is with resolving APS issues. Especially in favor of victim of POA abuser. I've read on line they don't have a lot of financial support for APS.
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