kukla77 Asked September 2012

Is paranoia part of dementia or Alzheimer's?

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mother is 98+ and lives in an assisted living facility. She's convinced people are talking about her and things are missing and they want her out of the facility...I've tried to convince her she's mistaken but I'm exhausted going round and round..

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Oregongirl May 2015
What is causing this illness? Why has no one found a cure? Is it because it is an old person's illness and it is not important? I hate this illness as I know many of you do. We are helpless and they end up in a secure living facility in the end...It is very very sad.
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Doriana May 2015
My mother is convinced someone steals her buckets from the shed???? She goes through stages, this one is the bucket stage, the last one was lids for saucepans that were being taken?I go along with it because I cant reason with her, I hate this illness!!!
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Oregongirl May 2015
I love this....My partner and I cared for his brother in law and so at the same time, I volunteered in the Memory Care Unit. I could write a book on the funny things people do. I was corrected for laughing about one instance. But, I am sorry, when this happens, you have to go into their world and not put them down, but play along a bit. It always worked. I had one guy ask me why the cab had not come yet to take him to the airport. He whipped out his wallet and said, Look, I have the money, just get that cab here, I am going to miss my flight. Now how do you get through this without a smile...?? I loved working with all of these people..They are so loving and really believe what they are saying. Why would I fight with their reasoning. Just go with it...

Now it is my partner and he has not been diagnosed yet But, he plays with the blanket, reaches for things, tries to move his hands all over the sheets looking for the food for the dog etc. I see his doctor this week. Problem is: I cannot have a decent discussion with the doctor as my partner is sitting right there. Any ideas on how you discuss things in front of the person you are talking about??
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Singingway Nov 2014
I use the homeopathic remedy Arsenicum Album. It takes the craziness down a few notches, and sometimes even brings her out of it. I like to give it at 5pm, to head off the Sundowners.
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MT1972 Nov 2014
My mother-in-law has become so paranoid. She too thinks someone is coming in her house moving things though nothing is missing. When something comes up missing we look everywhere but never find it, a few days later it show up in her bedroom and she always says "those people" coming into her house while she is gone must have done it, though she's usually home most of the time these things happen. What's frustrating is she accuses her son of having a key and thinks he comes in and moves "stuff" and takes things, when only the middle child who takes care of her has a key. She won't give one to the other 2 children or grandchildren. I pray that nothing happens to her while the daughter with the only key is out of town. She is so paranoid and sure that "people" are coming into her house that she bought expensive 4 camera system that she had set up throughout her condo. She used to put a broom across the door to the garage until I pointed out if someone really wanted to come in that door a little broom wasn't going to stop them. Tried to convince her no one could get in anyway because it's an electric door that changes the code every time it's opened and closed. She now has a dead bolt on all doors. Is there no medication to lessen the paranoia without turning a loved one into a zombie? Government needs to really push for a cure or better meds for Alzheimer/Dementia patients, the statistics on the number of new case of Dementia are increasing at an alarming rate each year.
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Jinx4740 Oct 2013
It's still early enough in my husband's disease that I can say the cat took it. He sort of accepts it. (sort of gets mad.) But logic can't help. geedeeooo is right to tell her mom that the intruder is gone now, not that there is no intruder. You have to deal with their reality, not yours.
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Oh my goodness. Some of this is just hilarious. And so terribly sad. ..My dad is the same way. He's always fussing around with stuff, moving things from place to place in the house, but never knows that he ever moved them at all, much less where. And of course he always claims that it wasn't him..., he never touched it, someone else must have taken it. Well he lives alone, and no one else is ever in his house, except me. (So his emphasis on the word "someone" only means that I must have stolen it.) I got so fed up with denying that I took his stuff, that I've started saying "It must have been the fairies, because I DID NOT TAKE IT". At least he still has enough functioning grey matter to realize that I'm being facetious. But that just means that the argument keeps going on and on...
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zoomdots Apr 2013
continue to reassure that she is safe, that she will be included in family events, is she past the remembering? there are a number of ways to reflect with her about the past in a way that is to distract her or minimize these fears- photos are a very useful technique
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geedeeooo Apr 2013
My mom gets scared a lot. I just try to reassure her that she is safe, that only her husband and I are in the house with her and we will take care of everything. When she talks about those boys trying to get her we tell her that they went home already. Or if those people are doing something nasty we tell her that we will stay here and let them stay away from us and take care of their own business. The worst for my mom is bathing. I try to do what the communication advice says, look her in the eye, say her name, get her attention and reassure her. My mom is past the stage where she says that those girls are coming in her house and taking her things. I guess what ever it is that infuriates us about this disease is eventually going to be something that the loved one won't even have enough left in them to do. I'm still learning everything as it comes, I've never experienced anything like this before, I don't even have kids. I have heard that the person with ALZ eventually does nothing at all before the end. I guess having all the combativeness and paranoia, etc. are better than having nothing at all?
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zoomdots Nov 2012
This forum is such a challenge.
What an outlet for families & workers both
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