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There are several transferring techniques and I would suggest getting some professional demonstration so you will not hurt yourself or the patient. If the patient can bear some weigh, there is a technique that I learned from a hospice nurse which I liked. The patient hugs you around the neck while you place your hands under his/her hip area where the legs meet the buttocks with thumbs outward and the other four fingers inward cradling the bottom and sort of making a seat. Also the patients legs are locked inside your legs which gives them support as you lift them up and pivot them around. Make sure your back is straight and use your legs to lift and not your back. Have the chair as close as possible and the patient sitting as close to the edge of the bed as possible before beginning. It is easier to do if it is demonstrated rather than reading about it, but it does work.

If the patient cannot bear any weight, then a hoyer lift is required and if the home can accommodate it. You will be trained in how to use it by whomever you rent it from and home health aides.
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If you're working with a home health aide or nurse, they can show you safe transfer techniques

There are a few articles and videos on safe transfer techniques such as. However, you should talk to a PT, trained/certified home health aide, or home care nurse before trying these on your own.
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It all depends on the patient. Can the patient stand with assistance? Is the patient unable to to use their legs or are the legs no longer strong enough to support their weight?? I will assume that they do have use of their legs but need assistance to stand and pivot. My recommendation would be first and foremost to invest in what is called a gait belt. Put the gait belt around the patient's waist, have them put their arms around your neck and tell them on the count of 3 your going to assist them to a standing position. Pull up on the gait belt until they are in a standing position. At this point it is easier to help them pivot to another chair or into bed. Never let go of the gait belt until the patient is where they need to be and safe.
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