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My grandma cannot walk and her legs are becoming bent.

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Mom is 95, has severe osteoporosis, has had multiple breaks since she was 62. Doctor didn't put her on Fosamax until she broke her hip at age 81, more than a decade after Fosamax was available. I think that once you're in your 70s and older, there's not much that can be done to slow the progression. I'm 65, have run 30-50 miles a week since I was 17, work out with weights, yet I was diagnosed with osteopenia when I was 51 and was on Fosamax for 10+ years. I wish as osteoporosis got as much attention as breast cancer; it affects so many more people and there is no cure. Mom's just one major fall from dying. Something like 50% of women died within a year of breaking a hip bone; one of Mom's friends got a blood clot and died 3 weeks later. Mom now uses a walker 100% of the time, even in her home.
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Good to talk with her doctor about slowing the progression. Truth is walking will always be important, but long distances (several blocks to the store) will never be the same. I got one of these Drive Medical Sfscout4 Spitfire Scout 4 Wheel Travel Power Scooter for my grandpa for long distances, and he loves it! He will use it to go where he needs to, the park it and walk around a bit, and come back to it to get home. It's given him new life!
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Discuss this with her doctor.
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As mom got weaker and weaker, she began walking like prehistoric man. Knees bent, head down, hunched over. I think it's a natural progression into old age myself. I'd always remind her, "Mom! Straighten your legs! That was good for two steps. And, "Mom! Straighten up!" Another two steps. I finally gave up.
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apunagaraju, are you sure the bend is the bones and not the knees or hips wearing out? talk to her doctor .
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There are medications that build stronger bones, but I'm not sure when they are appropriate. I asked my cousin's orthopaedic doctor about them and they said they would not recommend them for her. She has dementia, but I have no idea why. She has osteoporosis and has sustained several recent fractures. I think I'm going to push the matter. Calcium and Vitamin D just doesn't seem to be enough.
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Have you talked to her doctor about the problem? There might be some sort of physical therapy or exercise that could help her, or perhaps some medical equipment.
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