Can my mother whose on Medicaid now be forced to share a room with a smoker?

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My mother has been living in an assisted living facility in her own apt for almost 2 years. She is now on medicaid and must share a 2 bedroom apt. The woman they want her to room with is a smoker and very sloppy. My mother is neat as a pin. I went to see the room yesterday and it reaks of smoke. I've been told that the smoker will be leaving soon - 3-4 weeks - but I don't want my mother to be subjected to the smell. Plus all of her belongings and clothes will smell of smoke. I don't think it's fair to do this to my mother. The woman obviously smokes in the room when she can get away with it and it really upsets me that my mother has to put up with this even for a few weeks. My mother is upset about it b/c everyone talks about this woman b/c she stinks and therefore the apt stinks. I've been complaining about this to management and they're giving me lip service and tell me it will only be temporary. I don't know what to do. I feel they're being so unfair to my mother. I have a hard enough time to get my siblings to go visit her. Doesn't my mother have any rights? It's so unfair and it's making me crazy.

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In NY you can not smoke in hospitals or on the grounds but is most NH you can smoke outside in a certain area and residents can not keep cigeretts in their rooms -they have to get them from the office and in some NH's they can not be outside without a staff member in attendance.
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My mother and her sister each live in subsidized senior housing. My aunt's building is new and lovely. My mother's building is older but very well maintained. My mother, a smoker for 78 years, can smoke in her apartment but not in any common areas. In my Aunt's building, residents can't smoke in their apartments or common areas. (Same state. Same metro area in fact.) We have often thought how nice it would be for the sisters to be in the same building. My mother would rather keep on smoking than move into her sister's lovely building and be able to play cards with her, etc. So Ma stays where she is and visits her sister by telephone.

Smoking is a herendous addiction. IsntEasy, I can imagine how difficult it is for care facilities to deal with this.
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I THOUGHT IT WAS AGAINST THE LAW TO SMOKE IN ANY HEALTH CARE FACILITY YOU MIGHT WANT TO CALL THE STATE.
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Also if your Dad was in the service she will get about est. $1200 a month from Veternan's Assistant for her care. Look on line. It's a long process, but it might be worth looking into. Good luck.
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If the management has been trustworthy for the past two years, and given that they did warn you up front that once your Mom's money ran out, sharing would be the next step, I'd trust them now. I work in senior housing and can tell you that senior smokers are a problem in every community. We do the best we can with respecting the resident's right to smoke while ensuring the comfort of everyone else, including the employees. Truthfully, we try not to allow smokers to move in. They are that much of a problem. Families know it and often hide the fact that the person is a smoker. Offering to let your mom share a 1 BR sounds like it was the best they could do to put her in a smoke-free apartment until the smoker moves out of the 2 BR. Families often have a hard time seeing that you can only do what you can do. The facility has to stay afloat (apartment rents need to be paid) for it to remain a nice place to live. We have often allowed residents to remain in their apartments at reduced rent for awhile until they're able to work out alternate arrangements, but if there's a tenant ready to move in at the full rent, we must accept them. We have to meet our budget to stay in business.
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I'm am glad you have the problem resolved. Perhaps the AL would agree to painting the room. The smoke is now in the curtains, linens & walls. This is still a hazard to your mom's health. It's obvious this woman DID smoke in the room. I'm so sorry this happened. You are such a loving daughter!
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It is illegal to smoke in health care facilities, such as hospitals, nursing homes and assisted living facilities in Florida. Designated outdoor smoking facilities are allowed, although some hospitals prohibit smoking on thei campus
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Igloo - sounds like a good suggestion. Thanks.
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Will - sounds like a got plan. You know there is going to be "smell" issues with the new paint. What about increasing Proctor & Gamble's profits and buying a lot of all co-ordinated scents Febreze products and get them going in the room. The free standing ones are great (no spills!) and they have a "touch" nightlight one that has an embedded fragrance in the shade that is pretty cute and servicable. They all work for 30 -45 days and that should be just the right amount of time for paint and construction odor to be gone. Maybe buy one to give to the caseworker and the supervisor - a little goes a l.....o....n....g way with that level of worker.

Justcare - in some areas there are "Air Force Village" for retirees. Very well run
and go from IL to NH with dementia homes for group living. Most excellent.
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Thanks for your thoughts justcare. My dad was an army veteran in WWII and passed away in 1965. My mother re-married in 1990 and my stepfather wasn't in the service. Unfortunately I was told she wouldn't qualify b/c she re-married and my stepfather wasn't in the service.
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