My mother has just been diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease Dementia, what should I expect from her health and wellbeing in the future?

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My Mother has just been diagnoised with Parkinsons Disease Dementia by her neurologist. It all started after a minor surgery. She has had tremors for years, not bad, but progressivly getting somewhat worse over the last 5 years. Other than that, there were no symptoms that the "layman" would pick up. After her surgery, general anestecic, she developed memory loss, confusion and just an inability to handle some of lifes daily struggles. A personality change also happened. She is not the same person she was before the surgery. I am now living with her and my father 5 days a week to help out, Both 86 yrs old. Dad was diagnosed with Dementia 2 yrs ago. Mom is now having trouble handling "life" herself, so I am here to help care for him as well as her, even though she thinks she can still do everything herself. My question; does anyone have a similar case and what can I expect in the future.

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My mother has Parkinsons and has had it for many years now but now has dementia also. Please look into the medications their doctors prescribe and to research the long term side effects on them. Sooooo many medications now have a dementia side effect to them and I am sure if people knew that some alergy related medication they use could give them dementia they would STOP. Doctors dont tell you to watch for certain things you have to research on your own. I think my mother got dementia from the side effects of two of her meds mixed. I will never know and my mother only had a slight wrist tremor but now after many years , she cant have a conversation or knows how to do anything really. We have been to many doctors my dad is her main caretaker/phamacist. First off I hope you have help....its very difficult. We are lucky 4 of us to help my dad. He goes to a caregivers support group which you should definately try. Your mother should try to get her to go to classes...group classes with people she can relate to. It was extremely difficult to get my mom to go but after awhile I find it to be better than any drug or doctor. ROUTINE is KEY and DISTRACTION. Dont fight her they live in their moment my mom is living in Cape Cod as a nurse but she is here in NJ.
You will find you start to fibb a bit but its better then aggravating anyone. My dad had a hard time with this but does it like breathing now. I had to tell my mother they needed volunteers at this class and that worked they ask her to help pass things out and bake. Every patient is different on how they progress but their medications will change her and you have to figure out for yourself if they are working for her or against her. Honest opinion from me to you.... If I could do it over for my mother I would try medical marijuana first!! They have it in tiny chocolate form but I have heard some dramatic things about it. Once, my father and I were trying a new doctor and I cried telling him I think shes over medicated and she is my only mother please help. We showed him Marijuana information that he shoved away and didnt look at then prescribed another medication that we already told him gives her haluccinations. Im sorry that I'm rambling I just wish the best for you and yours and hope all goes well for you! God Bless and Good Luck!
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My beautiful wife has Parkinson's disease a nurse for 40yrs, although now separated it is hard to see this beautiful person of 61yrs look,and talk like an eighty+yr old. I feel helpless,as to where to turn to,and go.please God take care of her
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Please start by using the Internet to gather as much info on Parkinson's Disease with Dementia and its close relative, Lewy Body Dementia. They are both caused by damaged proteins in different areas of the brain. Both are degenerative diseases, that is, there is no cure, but there are medications that can help. Probably the best website is the Lewy Body Dementia Assn's, www.lbda.org. They have a wealth of information as well as forums where you can read what other caregivers are doing to cope with the many facets of LBD. Also, look on Amazon.com for a book, A Caregivers Guide to Lewy Body Dementia. In short, get as much info as you can to be prepared for a long rollercoaster ride.
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Dane has given you good advice about getting disease-specific information online. This is not the same as Alzheimers or Vascular dementia. While dealing with symptoms may be very similar from on type of dementia to the next, the overall picture, prognosis, and what you can expect can vary greatly among the types. What kind of dementia does your father have, do you know?

My husband has Lewy Body Dementia, which is essentially the same pathology as PD, but with the cognitive decline beginning before the Parkinson-like symptoms. I can tell you that there are drugs that should absolutely never be given to these patients (which sometimes even doctors, especially emergency room doctors don't know) and other drugs that have a higher degree of success for these patients than for the population they were originally developed for. So, find out about the specific diseases your parents have.

That said, it is also true that it is impossible to predict the exact course the disease will take in any individual.

Who takes care of your parents the other 2 days per week?

Noname's suggestion to start looking for help is spot on. Get your aging council or social services involved, to learn what options are available. Some services focus on helping the elderly stay in their own homes -- meals on wheels, cleaning help, visiting nurse, someone to help with bathing, etc. Others provide some respite for caregivers, such as adult day health services. And, of course, there is long term care placement which is often necessary at some point. Look into all this before you burn out!

Hang in there!
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Take care of yourself as soon as you can because as a sole caregiver..as many are on here..Please take our advice and be sure and take care of you too..You get caregiver Burnout before you relaize it. It will take a toll on you honey. Now, I suggest too that you call your local agency or nursing home and get information and they will lead you in the right direction to either get answers and or how to get some help. Best Wishes. Keep us posted. HUGS
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Hi M D 2,,,,So sorry to hear about your mom and the P.D. I married my husband 8 years ago, he is now 77, and looking back I believe he had the on set of P.D. back then. Some of the signs are; no sense of smell, his toes curl upward. he walks stooped, he suffles when he walks, he doesn't have much of a tremmor.
The web site webcast@pdf.org has some wonderful seminars that you can listen to. There is also another web site info@pdf.org that I found extremely helpful. I got more information from those web sites than I got from any neurologists or primary doctor.
I think that no P.D. patient has the same progression or has the exact symptoms as another P.D. patient. I call the senement drug the miracle drug. I believe if he didn't have that drug that he would not even be able to get out of a chair. Also teach her to be extremely careful of falling. About 3 months ago, just after we got new carpet, he stubbed his toe and went down and broke a hip and wound up in the hospital for surgery and then to a physical therapy nursing home for 6 weeks. He is now doing real well with a walker...........He sleeps a lot. He has excess siliva and will drool on occasion. sucking on hard candy helps this situation. His thinking process has declined. He was taught to improve his shuffeling. If you teach her to think before she walks and take longer steps that will help. The biggest thing that helped him walk better was the walker. I think that with the walker he doesn't have the fear of falling . I have learned it is a slow, hard, process for the patient and even more so for the care giver. Good Luck ! If I think of anything else that I think might help you I will ttu at this sight. Take of your self. Dane
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Hi Mom'daughter2!! First of all, I have never answered a question before, but you needed a hug and some moral support, even if only on line. You really have a full plate!! First of all, how was the diagnosis made?? At your next appoinment, you need to bring a list of questions including exepected progress of this disease and possible medications that can be tried. Also, document what is going on at home, especially changes in ADL's. You have so much going on, you may not realize that indeed something going on now happened a month ago. It helps me to jot down something on a daily basis. Bring specfics to the Physician. In many ways, dementia is dementia regardelss of the cause. Also, don't forget to take care of you. Even getting out for a 10 minute walk or going to a quiet place to read/meditate/pray.
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Yes, this story is real common, a marked decline post anesthesia. I don't think they know why exactly, it may be something to do with decreased mitochondrial function with aging. You can look up Lewy body dementia and vascular dementia - which is very different from Alzheminer's in some ways. I find that confuses a lot of people - they assume that if you still have recognition or who you are and who everyone else is and can converse, that you must be fine. But judgement and related social and thinking skills may in fact be absolutely terrible. Sinemet may be helpful, but watch for side effects. Antipsychotic meds should be used sparingly or not at all with this. I wish they would come up iwth a solution to the anesthesia problem, because some elders really need surgery you can't do under a local! Sorry you are going through this...
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