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Does she have a health issue? I'd make sure she has a good checkup. Maybe she craves sweets for a reason. Or, she could have dementia and not understand the food is already sweetened. At any rate, I'd think a doctor visit is in order.
Carol
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I know my answer will not be populare here, but that said; I noticed when I use to take my father food shopping some months before he passed away, he was buying sweets I'd never seen him eat before. We all know sugary foods are comfort foods and my poor father's life with my narcissistic mother; I felt he
should eat whatever he wanted if it made him feel better. He never ate sweets growing up or basically, never saw him until this time. He enjoyed cooking and always prepared healthy meals.

When I saw him putting all these sweets in the shopping cart; I felt so sorry for him. I would never ever tell him not to have them and never wanted him to have a craving that went unsatisfied. Of course, it is not healthy, but neither is constant stress from your spouse. And when you are elderly, you should be at least able to have the foods you want, unless, of course you are a diabetic, and could go into shock. Other than that, why not have what you want; they certainly deserve with all the other things they have to deal with.
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I am having a similiar issue with both of my parents. They couldn't remember if they had eaten or taken their meds. It got to where my mom would fix peach cobbler or pound cake and this would be their dinner. We would tell them they needed to eat "good" food. No luck. Since that time, my mom had a stroke so I have had to move in with them. Mom has been diagnosed with dementia and my dad acts the same. Many times they only eat sweets. Many times its an argument to even get them to eat at all. Is it good for them? No. Is it worth the hassle to "win" the battle...No. I choose my battles and be thankful they are still able to argue with me.
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The sense of taste is affected by aging, like our other senses, color of hair, etc. The taste for sweet is the last to go...so wouldn't you want to taste something too? Relax a bit about diet. Is it that important now?
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i was taught at an alz seminar to let , especially demented elders eat whatever they crave on the pretense that they have 19 different kinds of diseased organs and they arent long for this planet.
indeed my mother and aunt both have / had no organs that werent seriously compromised to include the brain. it always makes me question whether to hassle with putting my aunt in a seat belt .
why did kamikaze pilots wear crash helmets ? so many questions , too little ambien tonight..
im giving my aunt sweet rice with cooked apples in it in the am . she'll eat it or ill throw a refridgerator at her . cheap theatrics , nothin works better..
rice with fruit is the s**t , love it myself . it requires very little enegy to digest and in fact glides thru the bowels so smoothly that ya may as well eat it while sitting on the crapper . obvious exxagerations , cheap theatrics , whatever it takes . feed em a bratwurst fired from a 12 gauge shotgun. that wouldnt require much discussion or provide much time for dissent.
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From what I hear,all elderly love sweets. My 94 yr loves sweets and is not diabetic and does not have dementia. I try to limit sweets as much as I can. I dole out 1 serving portions of Hershey's kisses and buy unsweeted if available. I've told her that cookies, candy, crackers and chips are not a meal, and she needs to eat real food. But if she happens to drop her food taking it out of the fridge, or if her caregiver does not come in the morning, she can eat snack items instead (vs eating nothing.) This has only happened twice in 2 1/2 yrs, so it's OK. Other than that, all her meals are either prepared, delivered or brought to her. She does not know where the sugar is kept, should she go looking for it.
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I dont really think so.
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Diabetic Father will not eat healthy.
My father lost my Mom, a short time ago, they had been married 62 years. I have tried to cook what he likes, but he wants things like apple pie for dinner. It is tough to make him happy and keep his diabetes under control. What can I do?
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Good evening captain. Is that a fact: 19 different kinds of diseased organs (in addition to the brain obviously)? My mother has dementia and she loves and eats everything I put in front of her (I am an excellent cook, or so I am told), a practice that is excellent and only hindered at times because she refuses to wear her dentures. She also has had the strange habit with certain meats in which she masticates the meat and then rather than swallow the food, she quite unnoticeably puts it on the edge of her plate. She is doing this less and less thank goodness. She eats way better than I do. By the time I cook my husband's meal, my mother's, my dogs and open the cans for the cat, I don't feel like eating anything except maybe a bowl of frozen yogurt! I would like to add to my mother's list of favorite foods your sweet rice and cooked applies, since I have to admit she rarely gets apples unless I have made home-style applesauce, or when it is fall and I make an apple pie or tart. BTW does this mean you are caregiver to your mother and your aunt? If that is so my hat is off to you! But it seems my hat is often off to you for many varied reasons. Though sometimes you do have the opposite effect on me, I have to admit. God bless and have a swell evening/day.
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Whenever I get my Mom's grocery list [she and Dad are in their 90's], on the list is an apple pie, chocolate chip muffins, fudge ice cream, Mellowmars, Pepperidge Farm Soft Bake cookies, Little Debbie's Fudge Rounds or Zebas, Entenmann's chocolate loaf cake, and other regular grocery items..... thinking about all those sweets makes my teeth hurt :0

It's my understanding that as we get older, we lose our sense of taste.... so items that are very sweet really taste good to the older folks. Their doctor has no problem with my parents eating all those sweets as long as other regular non-desert non-snack foods are also being eaten.

Let them have fun with the sweets as long as it won't hurt them :)
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