My husband with dementia is still able to go out on his own but is doing stupid and impulsive things. What can I do?

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ejbunicorn, I was told by my father's attorney that he has every right to change and sign legal documents, even with a diagnosis of Alzheimer's/Dementia. Apparently something changed with the Florida legislature that protects seniors from their families whether it is warranted or not. I am also told by an attorney I hired the same thing so I feel stuck. I would need a doctor to state to the court that he is incapable but I don't know if I can get that as his doctors won't talk to me.
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My mom has also done some inpulsive things. However, my mom cannot get out of the house on her own. When she does impulsive things I try to get her mimd on other things. I dont know if that helps but it seems to work a lot of the times. I saw her Phys. Ther. doing it one time and I thought it was something that would help. I also try to tell the way I feel about certain things she does when she calms down. I hope this is helpful. Good Luck
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to stressesstpete, if your father has alzheimer's he should not have been able to revoke the poa or mpoa, I would look into this, you may be able to get that back
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I wish I had an answer for you. My father, 90 with Alzheimer's, lives with me but I work outside the home. He does careless and impulsive things too. The latest is he wants an eye lift as his lids are droopy. They don't impair his vision. I have no idea how he plans on paying for this, we/he doesn't have any money to speak of. Ruralwannabe is right, if I try to accompany or suggest a companion I am rebuffed with anger and resentment. He has pulled the POA's from family members so there isn't much I can do. I wish you the very best!
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That's the problem with dementia - you'll never know when something hits the skids. My advice: don't let him go alone - tell him you enjoy his company and you miss him when he goes out by himself. Gives him a boost and keeps you from worrying what he might be doing.
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Oh it is not as easy as one may think. There is dignity and then anger to deal with, because often the person does not think they are stupid and impulsive things. They think they are being bold and creative. You must invent ways to stay close and occassionally get p'd and put your foot down. Surprisingly, I have found (because I have this problem with someone too) that when they see anger, they pull back after a moment. After all, they know (in my case) that they need support, and without any at all, like if they get you mad enough, life will be difficult and really they love you and don't want you too upset. I think this works because I rarely express anger.
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Try to incorporate friends and family to go with him.Explain to them that you need their help in your husbands outings. If he is like my father he thinks he is just fine,but in reality he is a danger to himself and others.
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My 87 yr. old husband will do some stupid and impulsive things too and because one never knows when a person with dementia is not making accurate connections in their brain, it is best to go with that person so you can monitor their behaviors. It is still a good idea to get them out among people, until going out is very upsetting (yes, this will happen). Best wishes.
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Sounds to me that if he is doing stupid and impulsive things, then he probably should not be going out alone, do you have poa or mpoa?
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