What's the best way to deal with things when too many doctors get involved?

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My father's pulmonary, primary care, cardiologist and infectious disease doctors all have privileges at the same hospital. He was hospitalized at this hospital a week ago, then released to a nursing/rehab center, and was sent by 911 to a different hospital which was closest to the nursing/rehab center this morning. The problem is I now have a whole new set of doctors involved at this different hospital who have different opinions on treatment then his regular doctors. I really want his regular doctors who know his conditions well and have treated him for years involved again.

Has anyone experienced this and what can i do? I'm really concerned about his care.

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In the Province I live in Canada, we have a computer system that every doctor can access to find out who the attending doctors are and what has happened in the past and by being able to access this system, the doctors can follow through with what medications have been given, what tests have been done and refer to all of the aspects of every disease. I am lucky because of this system and I don't need to carry all of the material around with me. My dad has Alzheimer's and now my mom has Vascular dementia mixed and she lives with my husband and I. As a full time 24/7 caregiver this part of the equation gives me comfort. You still need to have a POA but that can be handled by the original doctors stating the circumstances and this also can be placed on the patients file. Maybe your health system needs some updating. I know ours does but at least they are working on it. Good luck and love to all. Vickie
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Something that really helps is to create a document that lists all the important stuff: the history of doctors and diagnoses, the meds. It's quite a job -- and like the last poster said, you need access to the info to create it -- but in the end it will save more time than it costs to make it and keep it updated. And when you whip it out and hand it to the next random doctor who you're suddenly faced with, (a) they are greatly assisted to do their job well, which they actually appreciate and (b) they will have very good reason to respect you. And (c) fewer mistakes get made in your absence, too, especially if you've put the major "THINGS FOR NEW MEDICAL PERSONNEL TO KNOW" right on the front page. Good luck.
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You MAY have to get transfer abck to his usual crew, but it might be worth it to consider that sometimes new guys will have better ideas - see if they can explain at all why they want to change things. My mom's diabetes care substantially improved with a new provider. If they are just changing things because they do it diferently at the new place, not because of any specific benefit to your dad, it may be the wrong thing. There are times that the usual correct thing was tried already, and did not work or had bad side effects, but the new people just assume the old people were idiots and never tried it. Or maybe they don't know some other details that would lead to different decisions - that happened to my mom too, one guy did not bother to find out she had a hiatal hernia and really bad GE reflux that needed chronic acid suppression, just assumed it was done in the hospital for preventive and stopped it....Mom could not give the history due to poor hearing and cognitive issues, but all of a sudden she complained she needed a hospital bed and could not lie flat, and we figured it out once they decided to let me look over the meds. It is not easy to stay on top of things - make sure you have a helathcare POA or at least a HIPAA release so you can get the info! If theyare not real communicatie with you and its too frustrating, there should be an ombudmsan or patient-famiy rep you can visit with and have them to facilitate getting things sorted out.
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The healthcare system is certainly overwhelming. You can request a transfer of care. Explain that it is in his best interest to be where everyone knows his history, etc. This is a two way street, the present doctors have to approve the transfer and the one of the original doctors have to accept. This can be done, even though you may meet resistance. If they refuse, you will have be very vocal in keeping the new team aware of past decisions and the expectiations of your dad and family. Good luck.
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