laughnsmile Asked September 2010

Is repeatedly standing then sitting and constant walking a part of dementia?

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susanper Oct 2010
I don't have an answer but my mother does the same thing- it is always worse if she is upset or in more pain from her back. She has recently been diagnosed with dementia and/or early stage of altztimers.
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Jennie Sep 2010
When my Mom was alive, she had a real problem with pacing back and forth much of the time. She would sit down and in no time she'd be back up, walking. As I understood it, it was a side-effect of the drugs she was on. She was a paranoid schizophrenic. Ask the pharmacist about the drugs your loved one is on, to see if this could be the reason. If so, perhaps they can be changed.
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pgscott Sep 2010
I call it 'puttering'. My mom cannot sit still long enough to carry on a conversation because of all the things she is forgetting/remembering. She shows me one thing, sits to discuss it, then suddenly stands up and goes in circles looking for something else she needs to get. Certain triggers get her going and there's no stopping until nap time!
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hapfra Sep 2010
Hi--I am back again - and with a more definative reply----as I checked this out for you and found the following:
Repetition
Repetition of questions or actions can be particularly stressful. This is often one of the first challenging behaviours evident in those with dementia. A frequent cause of repetition is impaired memory for recent events. Individuals with dementia may repeat questions or stories because they do not remember telling the stories or asking the questions. By observing the individual, try to identify triggers for these behaviours and develop strategies to eliminate the triggers from the patient's routine. Professional advice is stringly reccommended.
Best to you on your caregiving journey~
Hap
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denise55 Sep 2010
You all are probably right. My mom does the same thing. She really fiddles a lot. She lives with me and is always changing something in her room, which is probabl one of the reasons she cant find anything later! She does a lot of walking back and forth
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kkinsel Sep 2010
My dad has dementia and he is constantly walking and figiting all the time. I think its just part of the dementia.
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JulieWI Sep 2010
My mom has Alz and she does this. A couple of months ago she started pacing and getting very agitated. She will go to sit down and stand up and start again. Sometimes she is up again before she even finishes sitting!

This is very uncomfortable for my mom. She is anxious and upset and often cries. She wants to settle down and can't. The doctor is trying new medication. After 8 of the worst days so far, she has had 2 decent days in a row. I'm really hoping that is the medicine kicking in!

Please see a doctor. Hopefully they can help.
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deefer12 Sep 2010
Mom has Parkinsons and dementia. Because of the PD, she is now unable to walk on her own, which is a good thing! She is in constant motion. Never sits still, and was falling all the time due to constant jumping up to do who knows what!
As the dementia progresses, she is more manic and is constantly trying to get up, or grabbing at things. She won't nap, even when exhausted. When she is sleeping, her hands are still playing with the blankets!
Make sure you take them to their doctor for testing. They are probably confused and their mind is going from one thing to the next. Mom will think of something, then forget,and move on to something else. She can no longer control her thoughts.
Anxiety is also a part of this because the mind never stops. Medication should help to calm your loved one.
Good luck and get to the doctor for answers!
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hapfra Sep 2010
hI~ You certainly have a good question, as I am familiar with repeated questions, by my Mom when she had her AD. I would check with you PCP and even better-your neurologist, as this could be a sign of a dementia, or possible something else. If it is a dementia-Quick action is reccommended-to get things under control.
Best to you and your family,
Hap
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