openheart2 Asked July 2009

My mom has had auditory hallucinations (psychiatric), for which her doctor cannot find a cause or solution. Is there any explanation or or help with this?

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RobinOliver Jul 2017
Amlodipine for blood pressure caused my mom's. Recently, it was a UTI
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RobinOliver Jul 2017
My mom. Amlodipine for blood pressure caused auditory hallucinations. Recently, UTI caused them
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emptydream Nov 2016
My father is 90 and lives with me. At night he hears people jumping my fence and they talk outside his bedroom, bang on the walls and keep him awake at night. Although he says he has seen them, I've been able to narrow down that he only hears them only at night. Sometimes I hear him walk outside. According to him when they see him they quiet down. I love that he's here with me but I have a difficult time with his stories about these people, because I know he's hallucinating. He's otherwise so intelligent and can do so much, and does help me around the house with repairs. He thinks these people sleep in my neighbors back yards. He's very healthy just losing his hearing. I welcome advice.
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openheart2 Nov 2012
P.S. to Grace48. I forgot to mention that she "does" take Zyprexa every night, which has helped a great deal.
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openheart2 Nov 2012
In response to Grace48, after MANY sleepless nights and frustrating days, I have come to embrace the fact that it is all part of her dementia. Some days are good and some not so good. What I have found is that sleep is absolutely VITAL. The lack of triggers her paranoia, hearing voices, singing, noises, people talking about and threatening to harm her. So, I do all that I can to ensure she gets a good night's rest, which "could" entail 12 to 14 hours. Every day brings something new, but it certainly beats the alternative.
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Here4her Sep 2012
Grace48. Did you find an answer to your mothers hearing people. My mom has done this occasionally usually UTI.
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grace48 Aug 2012
Hi: My mother in-law is 93 and is beginning to show signs of memory loss and difficulty with generational relationships and orientation to day/date, but responds well to cuing and acknowledges the problem and asks for help.

For the past 5-8 years she has had auditory hallucinations with complete dramatic scenarios like a soap opera. She heard the voices during the night and during the day and would ask us during visits whether we heard them. She was sure she could hear the drama with the family across the street through her closed windows. At 90, she chose to sell her home and move to independent living in a continuuing care community and left the family behind. Over the last two years, she has acquired another family in the apartment above her apartment. She has been willing to talk with her neurologist (acquired during her one and only seizure 11 years ago) and her PCP about this "experience" and is on a low dose of aricept.

Until recently she has refused to see a psychiatrist, but she is getting more and more irritated by the cast of characters. She also has a fixed delusion that something is wrong with her son (my husband) and has woken me in the middle of the night on my cell to tell me that she is dressed and ready to go visit him in the hospital. She is aware that it is night, but believes that he is in such dire condition we should go to the hospital NOW.

She will sometimes acknowledge that these "experiences" happen when she wakes up during the night or from a short daytime snooze that these are "dreams", but then recount them as if they are real.
Otherwise she is good health, walks a mile almost daily, eats well, no signs of sleep deprivation, she has many people that she spends time with, she attends classes, etc. daily and has an involved and supportive family.

We have told her that these episodes are caused by changes in her brain and that
these "episodes" are very real to her, but we do not hear what she is hearing. She is very smart and well-educated and has been given more technical explanations by her doctors.

We are trying to get her an appointment with a geripsychiatrist, but four have refused her as a patient for a variety of reasons. I have moved to the fifth on my list.

Any comments out there
Grace
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oldcodger2 Jul 2012
Sorry - it appears that my D is not working properly - both of those hear's should be heard. :0)
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oldcodger2 Jul 2012
I realize this thread is old - but I ran across this info while researching a problem my mother in law has with hearing music. She hasn't complained of it in recent months, but for a while, she would swear she hear a mens choir or quartet singing the Star Spangled Banner - it was always the same song and usually in the very early hours of the morning. I had never hear of auditory hallucinations before and have found that they do not always signify something very wrong.
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openheart2 Jan 2012
Thank you and happy holidays Dragonflower. She does take Zypreza, which does seem to help greatly. However, when she does not achieve enough sleep during the night, nothing stops the hallucinations. Right now, I am grateful for the combination, so "I" can sleep :) .
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