Can Dementia come and go?

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I help take care of my mom who has Dementia. The signs have been there for a few years now, but things got really bad about a month ago with my mom seeing and hearing a lot of things that were not there pretty much everyday. This lasted several weeks and then almost all of it stopped for over two weeks. I'm not totally sure they stopped, but she seemed to be the mom I have always known for the most part. Then about a week ago it started again. She started seeing things, hearing things just as before. Is this common in people with Dementia? I cannot think of any changes in her lifestyle or health or the meds she has taken for years that would cause any changes. My question is "can people with Dementia seem to be stable or almost normal and then slip back into a state where everything seems unreal?"
Any thoughts? thank you

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i think the symptoms of dementia come and go. 4 years ago my mother totally lost her s**t. after a couple months in AL she returned home and was incredibly stable for 4 more years then the crazy returned with a vengeance. mother is as bipolar as a housecat so perhaps those cycles play into the overall picture a bit.. even now she has good days and then days chock full of paranoid delusion.
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irishbroad, it is true that competent adults cannot be held against their will. But a lot can happen in three months. Dad may come to like where he is and services he is getting. He may lose track of time, and accept that he always has 2 more months to go. He may get worse and truly be incompetent such that doctors will state that and a court would agree.

First things first. Get him eligible for financial help for the NH, and address the other issues as time goes by.
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Jeanne, man from Medicaid came to see if he qualifies for long term care. My dad told him he will only stay for 3 months. now home is saying unless we get him deemed incompetent, or he agrees to stay, he cannot be forced. They said, he would qualify for Global Options. But I don't believe that would be enough care, unless they send someone for 8 hrs a day, which I am sure they won't. He has severe Bi- polar, and progressive dementia, but I don't know what kind, knew to this.
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irishbroad, a regular schedule/routine is often very helpful. Having someone monitoring meals and meds and hydration is extremely helpful. It does sound like dad is no longer able to live alone, even though he is relatively young. He is probably where he needs to be.
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My father was is 69, and was in the hosp. Recently due to me having to call 911 again. Found him laying on the couch for 2 days, severely dehydrated, had gout, UtI. Told he has dementia and needs 24/7 care, I cared for him for awhile, but had to return to work. He was having hallucinations, not talking, bathing,eating, etc.. He is now in a nursing home and is now doing well. I am told it is because he is on a schedule? I feel horrible that he is there, but am afraid to bring him home, what if he declines?
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Defenitely check for a UTI - it can cause major behavior changes. I care for my mom too - she has dementia and is 88. UTI's affect her very much, you can get a home test at Walgreens. They are very helpful! Best wishes.
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I just wanted to say thank you for everyone's help! 4 ever grateful!
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my husband has been short on b12.. I am giving him b12 AND HE SEEMS TO BE IMPROVING..pplease tell me how nutritional definencies causes this type of problem.. My husband has had two brain exrays and it shows his brain is normal..could the lack of b12 cause his demetia?? please let me know..
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Yes, people with dementia often can seem lucid and carry on conversations and act normally. There is no playbook for what is and isn't normal in dementia. If she hallucinates or seems otherwise distracted - or rambling check for UTI's, nutritional deficiencies, dehydration, possible medication side effects and even a dental problem. Smaller health problems can have a bigger effect on cognition. Likewise disturbed sleep, or other changes to routine.

The person with dementia is handicapped with an impairment but still deserving of every opportunity to be treated and spoken to as you normally would, with recent discoveries, what science now documents about about brain plasticity it is worth keeping them in the loop as possible. Takes work but is worth it.
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Medications and side effects can sometimes factor in, as well as some dementias, or even dehydration and infections. Has she had a thorough medical and neurological evaluation? My dad and FIL see and hear things that just aren't there. Sometimes it can be very frightening or distressing to them. I have seen it come and go, intermittantly.
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