Follow
Share
This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Early on set regardless of the type of dementia is terribly devastating for the families that have to deal with it.imagine, in your 50's, looking forward to retirement and diagnosed with dementia that will only get worse.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

You are right, gladimhere, it is not rare for more than one kind of brain defect to be present. Which certainly can complicate treatment! "Early onset" can apply to more than one kind of dementia. It just means the dementia started earlier than is typical -- usually before age 60. I have a friend struggling with early onset Lewy Body Dementia, for example.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

And some have more than one type of dementia. A friend's wife has early onset semantic dementia. Haven't heard of it before and I have heard there are more than 70 types of dementia.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

As I said two years ago on this thread, The worst kind of dementia is the kind your loved one has.

Each specific kind of dementia has its own characteristics and its own likely symptoms.

There are more than 50 types of dementia. (Some say more than 70.) Every case of dementia is a specific kind, but very often the specific kind is not easily identified. My husband's dementia was Lewy Body. My mother's is Not Otherwise Specified -- in her case she has not been through extensive testing to try to label the kind. It is not ALZ and it is not Lewy Body. It certainly is Something but we don't know what that something is. (Nobody just has "dementia" -- it is always some kind of dementia, but sometimes the only way to know what kind is via autopsy of the brain.)

A good memory care facility has to be able to deal with all the possible symptoms of all the possible kinds of dementia. That is not as complex as it sounds. Several kinds of dementia include hallucinations. Many include paranoia. Some involve progressive loss of memory and in others the memory loss seems random. Treating hallucinations is pretty much the same no matter what kind of dementia someone has. The same with paranoia, or memory loss.

Being able to identify the particular kind of dementia can be very helpful for the treating physician, particularly as it related to drugs. And it can be helpful to caregivers in knowing which symptoms are most likely. But at home or in memory care, the symptoms have to be dealt with as they come up, regardless of the label on the disease.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

After being diagnosed with vascular dementia, my sweet mom said Thank God, at least it isn't Alzheimer's. After watching her decline for the last 2 1/2 years, I am not sure that this has been a blessing. There are certain things my mom cannot do - follow any process, understand anything with numbers, use the phone.The remote control is baffling to her. Selecting clothes to wear is a major challenge and her concept of time is gone. She will not remember if anyone came in the room 8 hours after they were there. It appears that with these strokes - there are certain things in her memory that are completely gone. I am not sure that Alzheimer's has the same progression but there are good days and bad - but on good days, she will still not be able to use the phone, remote or follow any process that is more than 2 steps.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

aggiemom~dementia is a catch all term for any elder who has a progressive memory loss diagnosis. There are several types of dementia with Alzheimer's, Vascular and Lewbody being the most common. When looking for a memory care facility, it should be well equipped and knowledgeable about "dementia". There is no particular facility (that I know of) that deals only with Alzheimer's or Lewybody. My mother is in memory care and the facility is excellent in their care, giving her meds on time, the activities provided and the attitude of the caregivers as far as being compassionate and caring people.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

What is the difference in the care dementia and alz? I am trying to find a memory care home and I want to clarify the different cares.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

To me, it's 6 of one and half a dozen of the other. I only hope we get legal assisted suicide in my state or nearby if/when I get it.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Dementia diagnosis was said to lead to Alz, but was put on meds anyway she did terribly (went batty and sometimes had uncontrollable emotional fits) on aricept, was allergic to exelon both in tablet and patch, ours is only on Namenda now (which by the way, I saw is being recognized for treatment of OCD).
Dementia is not a normal part of aging, but can occur through any brain injury, such as a car accident, stroke, etc. I am an education major, and using questions, to ask her how she feels, why she thinks this way or that, although people are not implying things, she often thinks so, and many things she says could be, but simply aren't. It's that short term memory thing again, it keeps getting in the way. Doing the vitamin thing, Super vitamin D3 and omega 3.
Since she has been home again after being in assisted living, she is perking up and doing well.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Dementia is not a specific disease. It's an overall term that describes a wide range of symptoms associated with a decline in memory or other thinking skills severe enough to reduce a person's ability to perform everyday activities. Alzheimer's disease accounts for 60 to 80 percent of cases. Vascular dementia, which occurs after a stroke, is the second most common dementia type. But there are many other conditions that can cause symptoms of dementia, including some that are reversible, such as thyroid problems and vitamin deficiencies.

Dementia is often incorrectly referred to as "senility" or "senile dementia," which reflects the formerly widespread but incorrect belief that serious mental decline is a normal part of aging.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

The worst kind of dementia is the kind your loved one has.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

There are 100 types of demenita, with Alzheimer being one of them, in fact it is the worst. Most with dementia do not get alz.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

According to what I have read via the internet's reputable sites, such as alz.org, webmd, etc., dementia is a classification of illness that affects brain function, specifically memory. Alzheimer's, vascular dementia, Lewey (sp?) body, and others are the specific types of dementia. They are totally separate diseases, however, which one the person has will affect how the disease progresses and the length of the person's decline. My mother was diagnosed with vascular dementia almost 4 yrs. ago following a TIA (mini-stroke) event. She had memory issues long before that particular "event." However, since that event, her decline has been more and more rapid. Much faster than just typical Alz. and seems to happen in little "steps" rather than the slow, steady decline of Alz. The doctor has explained to us that vascular dementia has a stroke component that is not present in other forms of dementia. Alz. and vasular are the 2 most common forms of dementia. Either way, my mother and all other dementia victims are being slowly stollen from their families and themselves. It's an incredibly sad, heart-wrenching disease and my heart goes out to all those currently suffering and those who will suffer if no cure is found - SOON - when the Boomer generation hits the at-risk age group.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

I was not clear on this either and most people are confused as well. My understanding through my own curiosity and need, found an answer by researching the subject on line. Dementia is a malfunction within the brain, so it alters personality and causes confusion. You can have dementia for many different reasons. For example : a sneeze is a symptom of an allergy or a cold or sinus infection etc. Alziemers is a disease and dementia is a symptom of the disease. Alziemers as far as I know can not be diagnosed properly till after death, only with an autopsy can a true diagnosis be clear. Ruleing out other causes of dementia and other factors have been considerdered, it can be assumed that a person has a demneted brain due to Alziemers Disease.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Well my mother was diagnosed about ten years ago with mild dementia and was put on Aricept, which I thought was only for Alzheimer's, so I don't know if even the experts know for sure where the two overlap. I think that Alzheimer's may cause a more rapid decline than dementia, but I'm not sure.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Mom's doctor once told me that although Mom has dementia she will probably never develop Alzheimer's....they're two different things. Alzheimer's seems to take root and start its insidious ways quite early, sometimes when someone is in their 40's or 50's, and it's usually never diagnosed at that age.. Dementia is more likely what used to be referred to as "senility," and comes on when people are older. It's my own personal opinion that Alzheimer's has a physical detereoration component that's not always present in dementia sufferers, but that could just be stemming from my own situation (the only meds Mom takes are 2 blood pressure pills...doesn't even have arthritis!). But there might be many folks here who have different stories...there's still a looooong way to go in diagnosing and treating both these conditions. And I have to agree with naheaton - it's all pretty much a crap shoot.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

My mother-in-law's doctor once told me, that just because mil has dementia now, DOES NOT mean it will ever turn into full blown Alzheimer's. It's a crap shoot I guess. So far so good with my mother-in-law.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Subscribe to
Our Newsletter