Is it common for dementia patients to have Hallucinations and extreme paranoia?

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With some types of dementia, yes. Paranoia is very common with Alzheimer's and some other dementias. Sometimes, anti-anxiety medications can help. I'd talk with the doctor to see if there's anything he or she can do. However, much of it we caregivers have to weather, and it's difficult. That I, and others on this forum, know first hand.
Take care,
Carol
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When do you know? How do you know its time to move this person you have loved and cared for to a home ?
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The scary part is hoping you can keep your loved one at home until their death.
Any advice on how to get that done. It can make you anxious. I really like this site it is very helpful to know we are not alone in this situation..
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My husband would lie in bed and talk gibberish to the ceiling. Occasionally, he would yell out in terror or fear without provocation. Sometimes he would cry "help me, help me" but didn't realize that he cried out. He could not identify what bothered or scared him. He also tried to express concerns about some problem from early days in his career. In these cases all that I could do was reassure him that the problems would be taken care of or that everything was OK now. It truly breaks your heart to see the torment that the brain sujects them to and to have no real ability to stop it. Antianxiety meds help, but sometimes are not effective, especially when dealing with the "sundowner syndrome." If it really gets bad, sometimes you have to revert to the "bigger guns" to ease the torment.
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I can certainly relate; my father has dementia with paranoia. He often thinks that we steal things and keeps changing the locks on his doors because he looses or can't remember where the keys are. He has had delusions of all kinds of things too.
Just remember that it never works to argue with a paranoid person, it only makes them angry and more mistrustful. Best of luck to you!
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That is good advice appleaday...try and divert the person to another topic, switch conversation or introduce something interesting, but arguing with dementia never works for me. There is just no way to make a person with dementia see things your way. The ability to reason seems to simply not be there anymore.
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Also keep check for UTI's. They can mimic dementia.
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Get her to a phyciatrist. Medications for all these symptoms is needed. You can also give her a feeling of protection by praying with her or a visit from a minister- you have spoken to and trust.
Oh, I know how family will not recognize these problems. I was told that my husband is the exact same person that he was when they were young. This is so common. Total denial. Therefore it is up to you to get all the needed help. A big hug and prayers for you and for her.
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It has been pretty common with my grandmother. She has dementia from stroke and really sluggish bloodflow from a hugely damaged heart. I believe her heart works at only 25-30% capacity at the present time.

Gran gets excited and worried really quick. Her nerves can be shot by watching the news, impending bad weather reports, or by seeing strangers walking in the street. She fears men walking through the house and people trying to get into her room when there is no one there. She also sees people that have already passed into greater glory which either is a hallucination or a really vivid dream.

It doesn't take much for her to become excited and nervous so we try and keep her exposure to negative news stories to a minimum. She can very easily internalize this information and she can become fearful.

One other thing I have noticed is she can't remember where she puts things, or drops things between cushions etc...when this happens I don't think she wants to believe that she is forgetful, or has become part of the problem. I sometimes wonder if it is just easier to blame someone else when things turn up missing or misplaced so often.

/hugs to you!
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Well, right now I am torn between wanting him to stay home and seeing if the time has come where he needs more help than I can give.Both ways is scarey.On the other hand, being much younger than my husband makes me feel there is something very wrong with my dieing first. I live day to day with these thoughts. It would be nice to be able to have him home till the end but the doctors
are talking with me and helping evaluate. One thing for sure. Have a place selected and be on the list. Then if you are sick you do not do what I did...pull out the IV and go home because nobody could control him. And I still am looking but you MUST have a plan B. God Bless you
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