spollard Asked November 2010

My husband’s grandmother needs to be put in nursing home but she doesn't qualify for Medicaid because she owns house that is mortgaged by her son. What can we do?

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by her eldest son in her name she has demenchia and was taken advantage of trying to get loan nulled she is living in florida with us and has to go by california medicaid laws and dont qualify if the house is mortgaged does it technically still belong to her and considered and asset

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You are only allowed to keep your home if you are actually living in it. If the house is not your primary residence, then Medicaid requires you to "spend down" all assets (2nd home, boat, savings account, etc.) before you can qualify. If her name is on the deed with her son, then she co-owns property and Medicaid considers that a liquifiable asset.

Remember, Medicaid was intended for the "medically indigent" (the official term) - those people who had no assets and very few resources. It was never intended for middle-class people. Medicaid requires a person to have liquidated all possible assets before they would be "poor enough" to have Medicaid pay for nursing home care.
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Check the parallel thread "My husband's grandma with dementia lives with us and is violent to our kids. What should I do?"

There are children who are experiencing violence in this situation. Medicaid or no Medicaid, she must go. Who has medical and durable POA for her. I hope it's not the eldest son who took advantage of her. This is one horrible mess.
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caregiver63 Dec 2010
It depends a lot on what the family dynamics are. Every family is different. Perhaps the son wants nothing to do with the situation. That happens. That doesn't make it right, it's just that there are people in the world who simply are not cut out to be caregivers. It saves a lot of heart ache if they at least admit it. then the family can move on and select someone who is a caring and compassionate person. Caring for an aging loved one can, unfortunately bring out the worst in some people. That's when the rubber meets the road and you find out a person's true character.
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Well, then why isn't the son instead of the grandson taking care of this violent woman?
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caregiver63 Nov 2010
There are medi-cal specialists you can call. They will charge for advice. But in Calif, you can own your own home and not be penalized. Try Googling medi-cal specialists. Best advise I can give you, is, unless you personally KNOW someone who has been through this, then please don't listent to "well meaning" friends. The aren't in the position to advise because they've never experienced this. So they can possibly know what they are talking about.
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