My 83-year-old dad lost his sense of smell and taste. What can cause this and how can I cure it?

Follow
Share

This happened about 6 months ago. Obviuosly it makes it hard (for us and him) for personal hygiene, cause he can't tell when he smells. But I'm bummed he can't taste his food anymore and would like to help him. He's still eating plenty but who doesn't want to taste a good burger or veal marsalla, right?!

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Find Care & Housing
3

Answers

Show:
Some loss of taste and smell is natural with aging, especially after the age of 60. There are also other medical conditions that can contribute to the loss, for example: certain medications, including beta blockers and ACE inhibitors, poor dental hygiene, nasal and sinus problems, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and cigarette smoking. I don't know if your father has any of these conditions, but loss of taste and smell can have a significant impact on his quality of life, often leading to a decreased appetite and poor nutrition. Frequently when someone loses taste and smell, they are only drawn to foods that are extremely sweet or very salty. Neither is good for an 83 year old man. It's important that you seek the counsel of your father's doctor. If this is due to age-related loss of taste and smell, you most likely can't reverse it (and you cannot fix it), but if it is due to another condition, it's possible that some of the loss might be treatable. You don't want eating to become a chore for your father. This is definitely a time when you should have a doctor's evaluation.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I'm pretty sure that all our senses start at the brain, so it stands to reason if there's a problem with the brain that's where a doctor should start looking. But then again, when my nose is plugged up I can't taste, so maybe it's not permanent? I'm sorry, what a bummer not being able to taste your food. I'd be skinny for sure.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

My husband has lost his sense of smell entirely. This effects the sense of taste, although that has come back somewhat. For him it is a result of having Lewy Body Dementia. I'm sure it is not exclusive to that disease. As far as I know, there is no way to regain the sense of smell. My husband likes his foods more highly seasoned and he frequently adds tabasco or something similar to his foods.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Related
Questions