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Not all do, but many use language you've never heard from them before. However, dismissing this as "not in pain" - please don't do this lightly. If a person can't articulate their pain - explain what hurts and how - then he or she may moan or even become angry and agressive.

Generally, there is emotional, if not physical pain and/or frustration at the bottom of this behavior (not always). Please check with the doctor and describe the behavior in detail. Maybe something can help.

Take care,
Carol
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It is likely that a visit (or more) to your physician will be the best manner to arrive at a definitive conclusion regarding if the presumed pain has a physical basis. Nonetheless...

After coming to an understanding of whether or not the basis is physical, never ever forget that to an Alzhemier’s victim, as intellect, logic and reasoning diminish, their emotional content becomes their entire existence.

Their Memory Will Surely Decline. But… Their Emotions Are Perhaps In ‘Overdrive’.

I cannot stress this aspect of an Alzheimer’s victim’s life more. Though they often don’t have the faintest intellectual idea of anything going on around them, nor are they able to reason through even the most elementary considerations… they still maintain perhaps even intense emotions. You or I might by the use of intellect and the power of reason be able to apprehend, guide or even subdue our emotional responses to events in life. But depending upon the extent to which Alzheimer’s has brought the victim’s digression, an Alzheimer’s patient can’t even begin to grasp the concept of intellect or reasoning powers, much less employ either.

It's quite the norm their fears arise because they can't comprehend all is well relative to what they are about to experience. (Finger nail clipping or washing their face, as the above notes indicated.) Or if not about to experience anything, even what they are at that moment in the privacy of their own mind are thinking. …For the victim – Emotions are everything… As they digress, the entirety of
their existence more and more revolves solely around emotions.

Assuming issues of safety and health are under control, make guarding and nurturing their emotional content a huge priority and life will become so very much easier. For all.
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Dear J, In 12 years, the only time my Mother ever moaned,was when my older brother who lived in the house with her and about whom she worried constantly, passed away unexpectedly and suddenly one morning .At the time, She had no motor control whatsoever, could not even open her eyelids and hadn't spoken a word for a few years. Mom herself then died, 3 months later.I spent most of every day with her all those years and I maintain that a part of her was ALWAYS aware of her surroundings and would often respond to her environment in very subtle if not unconventional ways.No one will ever persuade me that she was a "vegetable" .I think that moaning and cussing is trying to communicate something, if "only" the frustration of not being able to.Many people with alzheimers are chilly all the time, a side effect of the medication. One of those little fleece blankets can be soothing and cozy. Please DO NOT ASSUME that the person is not in pain and do not let any M.D.s to blow the person off either.You need a good MD or RN to help you. This could be a new symptom emerging,or a problem that needs looking into. The Alz. Foundation is an excellent resource for you. I hope you solve this mystery, if not write again and we'll keep trying till you get an answer. Best of luck and God Bless,Hang in there, DT.
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As a geriatric nurse, every Alzheimer's patient take on different behavior. Remember the brain is sick and the brain controls everything about emotions, pain, laughing crying, tells us when we hurt, when we have to use the bath room, the list goes on and on...When the brain gets sick all the things it controls get sick also and does not work correctly. A non violent person may become violent, laughing or crying inappropriately can begin. The speech and language can change drastically to the point of speaking extremely vulgar with massive amount of loud profanity. Just remember it is the disease not a willful act of the person.
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it varies from patient to patient depending upon psychological neurological variables, personality, medications taken, environment, and many other factors. as said before there can always be pain so learn to observe very carefully and discern very deeply.
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IN my experience my Mom screams when I try and cut her fingernails, which she never did. She will sream before I even touch her with a washcloth now too, very very skiddish and yes moaning and complaining, she was never a complainer. Mom never wanted to put anyone out for her, she always told us that, go figure she comes down with Alzheimers, poor thing. I have to explain everything before I do it, "I am going to wash your face, take out your teeth, I need to wash your privates, I warmed up the cloth, etc" but she still usually yells. A good gossip story, made up even, is the only thing that an occupy her mind and gets us thru it easier. Mom started to cuss a little, never did it in her life, but with the medication, she stopped that.
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Hi jdmb~After experiencing AD in my family, as a caregiver, I would like to say that all patients with AD do not act and respond the same way. They also are on many drugs that can possibly have a strange side effect. There are also several stages to AD-and some of them can present a bazzare behavor. Thus it is very difficult for the family or caregiver or both towitness and understand-as these people with AD are basically in their "own world"..
I would strongly suggest you contact your nearest Alzheimer's Association Chapter-speak with them, and possible attent a support group meeting. Although you may feel fustrated or even alienated--you cannot take it personal-as this AD person has a very different perception of their life than we do/did as a caregiver. You may also want to read-up, either online or thru books you acquire on the many behaviors one my encounter. The 24/7 # for the Alzheimer's Helpline ia (800) 272-3900. Knowledge is Power-as there presently NO CURE for this disease.
Best to you on your caregiver's journey!
Hap
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Just a brief follow-up----there are some people who do moan/cuss/and cry for help-and when you ask them what they want-they have no idea-it is all part of dementia. Check with the neurologist on this, and make sure-also ask your pharmacist, if this is not a medication interaction. Lastly, anti-psychotic meds and AD--DO NOT MIX.
Best
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If one is thinking of medicating their loved one to control the moaning or cussing, I would be very wary of this. So many people, adults and children, are medicated to control behaviors. But medications can cause unwanted side affects, cause more of an interaction with all the other meds the person is taking, and, in some cases, even cause death. Magazines advertising certain psychtropic drugs warn to not give them to seniors with confusion or dementia, that they can cause death. My mother was given a drug to control her outbursts in which she would throw dishes, causing them to break into hundreds of pieces. It caused her to become almost catatonic.
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My moms neuro also says the THREE antipsycotic meds are black labeled sort of speak, only use if you have to. But, his #1 choice of an anti seizure medication called depakote has been our life saver , and its the most common medication at the daycare I heard from the nurse. Mom doesnt have seizures, never did, but she is not agressive , combative, or wandering now. Her nervous anxiety of having "to go" have died down, its a blessing for her and us. Ask your Dr I would say, he knows best and he wouldnt prescribe anything that woudl interact with other meds, he is a dr, the pharmacy wouldnt either. Just be honest about all meds to every Dr you speak with .
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