How do we get access to my father's account to pay his bills if no one has power of attorney?

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My father is in the hospital on a vent and can't speak. He's been diagnosed with severe dementia, so even when he's lucid, he's not considered able to pay his bills or give us the ability via POA to pay his bills. Home and school taxes are due, and none of the family can cover the costs on our own - does anyone know any way we can access the account to pay bills in his name? Is there any other solution you can suggest here?

PS: His wife passed away not long ago, and we have no POA. Temporary guardianship appointment is about 30 days away, if he lives that long. :-\

Thanks in advance.

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N1K2R3, That is funny, Dr. Drew says that? Don't watch him or the bald guy. You are right on the money. My Mom and Dad were both very nasty and cruel to me. Verbal only, and you are correct no conversation where my point of view was ever considered. Tought love is the only thing Mom will understand and my brother as well. I have tried everything else. And you are correct that nastiness begets nastiness. This is so sad but true. Nice chatting with you.
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Hummm. Madge you are correct, failure IS a great teacher, albeit a painful one.
However, (and I don't know you), I detect a tone of resentment in your post.....a kind of "I'll show you" attitude. Subtle nastiness creates resentment and is transferable from parent to child, and then child to parent.... For example, the parent who instead of telling his son to stop playing the electric guitar at night, instead walks over to the wall and pulls the plug.......no conversation, no one-on-one talk. That smirk on the parent's face will come back to do it's damage someday. The converse is also true: Kindness begets kindness and hopefully understanding.........Have I been watching too much Dr. Drew?
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I didn't either until my kids grew up and I saw what a mess some families are. The ones who let the teens rule. I was no badass by any means. I got lucky and my kids are good. But I know many who are still making their parents dance to their tune. I began to notice how elderly parents can do some of the same thing. Just be obstinate for the fun of it. Want to control when it is time to let go a bit. Failure is a great teacher, failure to pay your bills, you lose your utilities. Failure to be nice to your kids, they don't visit. I have seen people who try and try to please a mean old parent and i think the parent gets some joy out of seeing their power. Let them see they need help. At some point most do.
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Hello Madge: I don't believe in "tough love".
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N1K2R3, Sometimes tough love works on parents as well as teenagers. Some parents have to be in "trouble" to ask for help and cooperate. When the lights go out and the water is off, they may sit up and say, well I DO need help after all. When MaggieSue explains a guardian can place her Mom in a Nursing Home because she has lost her rights, she might sit up and take notice.

As my son-in-law the lawyer told me, make a good faith effort and let it go.
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Madge: You said, " Why sign a check at all?" "Let the chips fall where they may".
Such an attitude reflects inconsistency. If you want to keep the lights on, the water flowing and the tax man off the property, someone has got to pay the bills.
I'd set up an online bill paying system. Most banks have them. Just start entering the bills and pay them. Do this with the banks persmission, of course. Your name or signature does not have to appear anywhere, no P O A required.
Am I correct on this issue? Anyone? ( I married a doctor, not a lawyer, so my expertise is limited to medicine not law.)
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Of course my mother is within her legal rights. She can do what she wants with her papers and she did. She'll be in a mess if she gets incapacitated, but she doesn't understand that. I agree the parent has a right to take away the POA and the child has the right to do nothing. I like the attorney's attitude, make an effort and then let it go. Enough is enough.
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You definitively need some legal advice. Since the law varies from state to state I cannot offer a specific answer to this problem. I am a retired attorney in Oregon. In my state there is a distinction between a guardianship (of a person) and a conservatorship (of property & possessions). It is possible to have both. So, before you can do much of anything you need to speak to your family lawyer and if you do not have one the state bar assn will give you a few names of those who can help.
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You might call the tax divisions in question and have them note on the bill your parent's illness and that arrangements are being made to appt guardianship. Also, with my Mom's account that no one but she was named on, I was able to set up an online acct to pay her bills and utilities by using her checkbook and receiving mail at her address.
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Why help someone who doesn't want your help. Why sign a check at all. Let the chips fall where they may. I have read too much about difficult parents who are difficult just to be, well, difficult. It is ultimately the parents right to take away a POA and it is ultimately the child's right to do nothing. It goes both ways.
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