Mum seeing a "shrink" soon in June.

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Hi guys good to be back!! hi to all and hope youre all still coping!!

Mum has FIRST appt with a "shrink" this month im now on my knees for more help here how can i make sure he talks to me and not have my mum telling him not to speak to me if i dont get to see him i think ill just crack here.
how has anyone else coped with this.

Mum had a geriatric assessment last month and the "cow" geriatrcian refuses to speak to me as "doctor/patient confidential crap again?

If a parent brings a sick kid to a doc would the doc discuss this with the kid and ask the parent to leave the room NO! why is this situation so different??

Also how do i make sure mum dosnt REFUSE to go?


aunt edna is shrink bound too . cuz agreed for me to take her . i thought doc might want input from the one who spends the most leisure time with her . glad i read your thread . if he doesnt want input from me at all it may be because hes adept enough to pick what he wants from her head ..
na . i dont believe that . phsyc is gonna need your input kaz , cuz patient will lie like a dog ..
Well i hope so! yep mum lies to everyone about me as ive said before they should get an "oscar". A true pro can see beyond this BUT ive met very few true professionals since mums illness and have had more sound advice on this forum than any pro with degrees in bullsh*t!
Captain youre either a great guy OR mad to now care for your aunt but good on you! youre a brave man with a huge heart you deserve alot of happiness to come youre way and i pray for you.
im not religious but i believe in a higher power some good has to come us soon! I know something is helping me cope and its not me being an angel something bigger than me is keeping me from cracking OR im not human maybe im an alien as i havnt cracked yet!
Hugs to you and hope you now remember me! LOL
You know, anytime my Mom has had an appointment with any Doctor, I just walk right in there with her and sit my a*s down. Haven't been asked to leave yet...
yea kaz , the ' other ' simpsons fan from here . he he
i believe if you do good things , good things will probably come back around . if you sow crap , youre going to surround yourself in crap eventually .
my mom and aunt were my influences growing up . the men were dullards at best ..
Good advice HP i will give that a shot! it really is so stressful as if getting them to go isnt enough hassle when you finally get them to go you are hoping the doc will agree to speak to you.

Yeh im taking no crap this time im the one caring for her and i have "rights".
Kazaa it's SO GOOD to have you back! Write a note to the doctor ahead of time with your comments and concerns about your mom. Then at least he'll know what the truth of the situation is, whether he lets you stay or talk to him afterwards. Sometimes with my mom, I'll tell her we'll go out to eat after going to the doctor. That will get her to look forward to it. Good luck and keep us posted.
1. he's a shrink, not a saint or a prophet. i wouldn't worry about who says what. from what i've seen lately, last 15 years or so, these guys/gals are there to write prescriptions for psychiatric drugs, period. the days of reclining on a sofa, pouring heart out to a freudian prevert are long gone. and chances are he/she will be passing off the case to a nurse practicioner in a new york minute.

2. you need a HIPPA, or whatever it's called, legal document. get a lawyer to write one up for you. this one document lets one or a group of people have access to loved one's medical records. even kid's records after they turn 18 are private, the parents have zero rights, or so i'm told by friend who has children.

3. the real problem you have is getting loved one to show up. every senior citizen in south florida is well aware psychiatric evaluation=loss of control of assets. i don't know how well informed they are there, they're very savy here.
a hipaa form is as simple as asking receptionist for it and getting patient to sign it . if patient permits someone to accompany them into visit then medical consent is implied . we, on here come from different states and countries tho , so thats something to consider ..
ive noticed that ednas printout of diagnoses have never listed dementia and her daughter was unaware of it . i could see this specific being witheld from families as long as possible because its a very personal and intimate health matter and the last thing the patient needs is some dull eyed family member telling them they are crazy ..
in my moms case i think family was only told of dementia in the last year of her life because the crazy was going to get real and the facts couldnt be downplayed any longer . sure enough , no sooner than mom got home and was coming to conscienceness , a niece had to blurt out ' dementia ' to her . mom said " oh bull , somebody drag this tugboat out into the front yard " . lol .. well played mom .. ( mom was near genius in iq )
What if you made your own separate appointment and tell him your side. That way he can put the pieces together...
My mother lives with me.I am the one that makes the MD appts and gets her there and I go in everytime with her. I have to know what the MD says because I am the one that dispenses the care , meds,etc. at home. My mother is on so much pain meds I can't depend on her to tell me what the MD said.I know about HIPPA but so far no one has questioned me coming in with her as she has to use a walker and it is very easy to look at her and see she can't take care of herself.If anyone gives you a problem start being assertive, ask questions, don't take no for an answer. If she is living under your roof ,that puts a lot of responsibility on you and how can you take care of someone if you are not involved with MD visits even psychiatric ones.I would just make it very clear to any MD that if they expect you to care for your mother then you will have to be a participant in visits.

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