My mom keeps on talking by herself and has become socially remote.

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My mom (62yrs) is living along in india . My father passed away 11 years back . we all childrens live aboard . recently i saw major changes in my mom . Some history :
1. my mom was taking blood pressure tablets since last 7 year . Last year(in March) she went to doctor . Doctor told new tablets have come in market , and suggested new ones . my mom started taking new ones .
2. She also had problem seeing thing . so doctor to be on safe side just brain MRI . As per doctor , they found that blood was not flowing properly to front side of her brain .
3. Then she was not feeling well , and went to doctor again. Doctor changed the medicines again .
4. She was good talker and quite social before . With these new tablets she became quite quite and reserve . We had to ask her to talk .
5. Then i went back , and she was alone . She stop all medicine , and this happen for 3 months .
6. This went till dec 2011 .
7. In Jan my sister brought her to new doctor (physicist) who gave her some more medicine
8. Now my mother is quite violent , she hates taking medicines , and keeps on talk of that she should have not stopped her Blood pressure medicines . and she does not have any energy left any more .
9. She does not want to brush her teeth, does not want to take bath . she shouting when we force her to talk bath .

Doctor say she has some problem in front of her brain ,,,but she should be ok .

And also , my mom does not get sleep in night . she is practically awake whole night . also she is always saying that she has lost power in her , and she would not stay long . Also she say that someone has come in the house when no one has come .

4 Comments

Can a person get a 'second opinion' by another doctor in India? Because if they allow it, that's what I'd suggest. I thought the front part of a persons brain is the part where logic, reasoning and the ability to socialize is stored. If that's the case, then your moms actions would certainly be expected right? She needs to be seen by a neurologist for a second opinion.
Perhaps she "should" be OK, but clearly she is not. She appears to have symptoms that could be dementia. Perhaps what shows up on an MRI is not sufficient to explain her symptoms -- she "should" be fine. But there are dementia pathologies that do not show up on an MRI.

There is no cure for dementia, but their are treatments for some of the symptoms, and that can improve the person's quality of life. Perhaps that is what the medicines have been about -- trying to find the right combinations to releive symptoms.

I would think that improving the sleep situation would be very helpful. Sleep deprivation can make other symptoms worse. Has any doctor tried to address that? Does each doctor have a clear picture of all of the symptoms?

My heart goes out to your family. These are very troubling symptoms for such a young woman.
Thanks a lots for your quick answer .

I notice some more changes in her :
1. My mom feels my sister has come , and keep calling her name . My sister stay in Mumbai with her husband which is away from my house by 130 km.
2. My mom talks about giving money . I do not know , which money is she talking about .

I am confused. Has she become mad ...i am not sure what exactly is madness , but i am very tensed .
Yes. I think that your mother has become "mad" -- she has problems in her brain that prevent her from behaving as she used to do. She believes things that are not true (delusions), like that your sister is there, and she may even being seeing things that are not present. She may not longer know how to take care of herself.

Of course, I am thinking these things based on only a few words from you. But this kind of "madness" -- dementia -- is so common that those of us with experience with it recognize familiar symptoms.

I wish you well in finding help for your mother.

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