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Freqflyer,
I'm learning from your posts so thank you. What happened to the original questions LO? Hope to hear how things go.
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BootShopGirl, my Mom went through something similar to your Mom. My Mom thought she could stand and walk, but she would fall every time she tried. Long-term-care placed fall mats around her bed, and set her bed as low as it could go. The facility even tried a seat belt for Mom's geri-recliner but within minutes they would hear a click, Mom had unbuckled the seat belt.... [sigh]. Finally placing bed pillows under her knees while in bed or the recliner made it more difficult for Mom to try to stand.

My Mom [98] also wanted to go home, but it took some time to realize it wasn't the house she had shared with my Dad. The clue that helped was when my Mom had asked if the cattle were out in the field... ah ha, the only home she lived in that had cattle was her childhood home. I explained to Dad and he understood, so we both were able to humor Mom by saying "maybe we will visit tomorrow".
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My mom broke her pelvis and her back. No surgurey. 1 month later and still in wheelchair. She keeps thinking she does walk because of her dementia so she keeps getting out of the wheelchair and falls. We are on #5 fall in 2 weeks. She is going to the nursing home but if course just wants to go home to her own house. At first she got up with the walker Out of the hospital but the falls have now taken their toll. Now stuck in wheelchair. Dementia is sad and it hurts us all!
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Oooooooooch, poor mother! Makes me squirm just to think of it.

The bit that usually breaks is the symphysis pubis, the rather weak joint at the front - is that what's happened, do you know? It sort of more comes apart than breaks in the way that you think of with broken bones, like a furniture joint that's been glued instead of dovetailed, if you see what I mean.

Nothing to be done except wait for it to heal. And one thing to look out for - my great aunt was given codeine for the pain, which made her constipated, like it would - and I can tell you from watching her that constipation on top of a fractured pelvis is about as miserable a combination as there is. So one thing you can do to help is see that her gut health is being carefully thought of. Poor lady, hope she's more comfortable very soon.
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Your poor mom. There is really no treatment for a fractured pelvis either, and the patients I have cared for were in a fair amount of discomfort; this can certainly effect her mood. Are they treating her for pain? There are several meds available for her to take that are non narcotic - topical patches, etc. I did have one patient that took an occasional narcotic when her pain was unrelieved by those other meds & it did help her a lot. I think she was 88.
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That is not unusual, even for people who don't have dementia! A healthy person improves as the injury heals. That is less certain for someone who already has cognitive impairments. Your mom may still bounce back at least a little closer to her baseline before the injury. Or she may plateau at this level. Or she may continue to decline. I don't know of any way to predict this.

Your mother is in a memory care facility, right? What is their take on your mother's prognosis?

I am so sorry that this happened to your mother.

Do you have a specific question regarding this?
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