I want to hear about Medicaid and how they can take your home and access bank accounts.

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I want to hear the 'horror stories' regarding Medicaid and how they can take a persons home and how they can access bank accounts. I want to hear what happened to you!

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Jessica, was your mother on Medicaid? Hospice can be paid through Medicare, which is why I asked. Was your mother in a nursing home receiving Medicaid when hospice was tending to her?
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ebkjln, it depends on what state you are in, who lives in the house now, and of course the back property taxes, any outstanding debts or nursing home bills. If you are going to be the Executor, you should read some books on estate law, or better yet, talk to some attorneys.
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both parents in NH. Assets almost all gone. So Medicaid will pay. When they de, that happens to their home ?
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Jessica, That doesn't sound good. Your dad is going to need legal advice. He is probably looked on as a tenant.
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So my parents are legally divorced but have always lived together so when my was put on hospice we did a quick deed to my dads name so he could continue to live in their house.mom just passed away so does anyone know if Medicaid will take house for payment??
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5horty - oh TUTMA is Texas Uniform Transfer to Minors Accounts. Most of my Medicaid experience is in dealing with TX Medicaid. Grandparents & parents can set up TUTMA's. Technically the minor is the owner of the account but sometimes the grandparents SS # is keyed into it if they are listed as custodian. I would imagine that other states have their own TUTMA style accounts and they too may be an issue for Medicaid.
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5horty - how the bank accounts are set up is going to be the determining factor in all this. If it is a joint account, then both SS #'s are going to be tied into the account. It will show up in any search easily. Keep in mind that once you apply for Medicaid, you give the state an all access pass to any & all information that can be keyed into their (and their spouse even if deceased) SS #.

If it is not a joint account but a signature account with full rights, then the funds in that account can also be viewed as their asset. I would imagine that a Medicaid ineligibility for this can be successfully challenged via a hearing. You are going to have to clearly show that there was no co-mingling of funds and that the account was not used for them or by them.

I do know of this being an issue for TUTMA accounts - kinda really need to closed out & placed in new minor account with nothing from grandparents anymore.
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shorty, they don't access the account, they do a credit check with your social security number. Anything with the SS# on it will show up, and believe me, that's a LOT of information.
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I would like to know if Medicaid can just look into a person's bank account even if they have not provided the bank account information? Like say A person is a secondary on another's bank account,( so the account is in the other person's name,) but never accessed the account, possibly didn't even know they were on it, and had applied for Medicaid and got denied for not including the account holder's income? I've heard of this happening, but don't know if it is possible for Medicaid to access an account of a non applicant just because the applicant's name is on their account?
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babs - if one is the "community spouse" who's mate goes into a NH and onto Medicaid, they are allowed to have or keep assets beyond the 2K in assets required for the NH Medicaid spouse. They are expected to keep some funds to enable them to live in the "community". Just how much $ is dependent on the state - as each state administers Medicaid under an overall federal guideline. For most states, the asset ceiling is about $ 112,000.00. Although 112K seems like a lot, it may not be enough for the spouse to continue their lifestyle, especially if they are a younger and healthy spouse and could outlive the NH spouse by years and they have a mortgage or other large debt.

If the spouse is $ dependent on the other (like a wife who didn't work and everything $ is tied into hubby's SS & retirement), then she will have to file to get MMNA - monthly maintenance needs allowance. Most states have this set @ pitiful low rates and it seems you have to get an attorney to work it so that you can get his income (which is expected to be his Medicaid co-pay to the NH) diverted to you to provide you income to live in the "community".

One issue for couples, is that Medicaid allows for only 1 car. So they give away the extra car to a grandkid & that triggers a Medicaid transfer penalty inquiry. Total PIA to deal with. For couples, what is often best is to trade in both cars and get a newer and more reliable car for the "community" spouse to use. If you have a mortgage and have funds beyond the 112K, then using the extra $ to pay off the mortgage is often a very good spend-down if she is staying @ the home. But you kinda have to do all this before the Medicaid application.

For community spouse/NH couples, Medicaid does a "snapshot" day in which all the couples finances are set on that day. So you have to get everything done before that day (like get the mortgage $ done & cleared; the cars done, etc) to optimize your use and control of your assets. Although you can do all this yourself, I would imagine for couples it is just too overwhelming to deal with as you are focused on your spouse & their care. If this sounds like you, then you should look into getting an elder law attorney to work with you on this. This site has a drop down list of elder lawyers by state which is an easy way to start all this. Good luck and try to keep a sense of humor in all this too.
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