I locked up the guns from my husband and last night was a horrible sundowner event. He took a crowbar...

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and opened the lockbox. He all of a sudden acted like he just had a moment of clarity and was shocked I locked his guns up. I was not going to stop him we would have had a physical fight. I am not ready for that but when I am I will pursue the guns again. If I can keep him in a good mood until tomorrow at 10am to sign the POA papers then all hell can break loose for all I care now. I have about had it.

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Most people just don't get it. If you aren't with the person with dementia, caring for them, protecting them, seeing how they have changed, observing the acting out, dealing with it first hand, etc. you can't really fathom it. I had no idea, until my cousin was effected. Of course, when you have a family member telling you exactly what is going on, I don't know how you can dispute or ignore it. And if someone TRIED to make me feel guilty......well......I don't think they would try that.
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I worry about OP too. In my neighborhood, a husband with severe dementia killed his wife. They were the most loving couple before he was ill. She was getting frightened because he was often hostile didn't always recognize her. Adult children made her feel guilty about moving him into care. This is something not acknowledged about caregiving. People suffering from dementia cannot exercise good judgement and should not have access to weapons. Caregiving is hard enough.
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I do think of TaraJane, who posted quite a bit about her husband who was progressing with dementia. I think they were both rather young too. Then, she posted that they were moving, buying a farm or something out of state. I never saw any more posts about what happened. I hope all is well. I do worry though.
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Your future safety will likely require him to move to a memory care facility. You are doing your best but do not risk your own physical or mental health.
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Sorry Cwillie, I did not notice that. These old questions come up at the bottom of the posts and I see a new person is the one who revived the thread. My apologies.
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This thread is TWO YEARS OLD and we haven't heard from tarajane since almost that long ago.
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Do you have children/grands who hunt? You could give the guns to the kids "for safekeeping" which would 1) allay his fears that the guns have been stolen, and 2) distribute his beloved belongings to his heirs in the way he would want. You can always say, "You remember how you wanted soandso to have that over and under. Well, with the increase in crime, it's safer in her gun safe than in our rack, so I told her to come get it. You can still use it next time you go hunting, but until then it's safely locked up."

Until that day, there are bright orange shotgun and pistol trigger locks that our sheriffs give away to people who need them. Inquire! They can only be taken off with the key and because they are "high viz" the police can see that they are protected - like the orange caps on toy guns.
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Ahhh! Gladimhere! Make a person with dementia POA? No!
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I respectfully suggest that you -- sell those guns, and tell him you had to have the money to take care of him. Get a big new lock on the door, and tell him, this is what old people do, honey, we use locks to defend our castle.
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MamaWulf why are you suggesting disabling the guns if the cops see him armed if they ever come to his house they will shoot him no questions asked that would be my reaction if I had someone pointing a gun at me and I didn't know it was disabled I'm sorry if I have to be rude but cops are trained to defend themselves and will react on that training
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