Hoping she will forget me.

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I know this is probably going to get some people mad but I have come to the conclusion at least for my situation I look forward to the day my mother looks at me and asks"who is she". Because finally that awful creature that I have let in my house will be gone.All that will be left is a shell and I will take care of that. I believe that is the only way I will be able to emotionally heal once dementia has taken that "creature" away.I read on here all the emotional devastation people feel when their loved one no longer remembers them and I do feel sympathy for them but I can't relate to it. I don't want to remember "her" anymore. I want her to just be some old lady that I take very very good care of but no emotion to it for me know matter what she says.I will always protect her, unlike what she did to me because I am not like her.I feel bad about this feeling but I would be a liar if I denied what I feel. Does/has anybody else here felt this way? Why do I feel this?Mentally, it would be so much easier day to day if she just thought I was a stranger that helped her out.

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I don't feel you are and I had a good relationship with mom. Although she tasted me like an adult with all the worries and doted on my siblings, which resented tremendously. Basically, my *job* was to be their mom and to support them. However, I did not and certainly do not harbor illwill, but do not buy into some old lady or man, no matter how sweet little old person seems, I know they could have been awful people. When staff wonder why no one visits, there just might be a darn good reason. You reap what you sow.
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After reading posts here for a few years, I think I can understand this outlook. I cannot "relate" to it, thank heavens. I have been fortunate not to have been dealt that particular hand. My heart goes out to those of you have been.
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Makes sense to me, too. When my NPD mother passed a year and a half ago, I was mostly relieved. I had mourned the mother I never had, the relationship we never had, long before she passed. Then I was thrown into caring for my father, who although not NPD, comes from the entitled generation who has no fears or cares for anyone other than himself. He's 91 pretty healthy mentally and physically, and like Joanne56, I cringe when I hear from his doctors (the simultaneously self congratulating and soul crushing news) that he could easily live another decade. 103, emjo, yikes!
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This whole ordeal just scares me. I left home when I was 17. Came for visits and such. See, my mom was so obsessed with my dad she let her kids suffer a lot of unnecessary abuse. I moved clear across the US, usually visited once a year. Fast forward 30 + years. Mom was diagnosed with AD. Dad (unknowing to us has a tumor the size of a grapefruit in his 1 remaining kidney) dad calls me and tells me about mom says he's tired and needs help... what do I do? I help. Took me a year to wrap my life up in FL and move here... during the interim mom keeps losing more and more memories, but dad keeps telling her I am coming, that I will be here with her to help her (he knew he was dying) so I get here, she's no clue who I am, just thinks dad is replacing her with me.... for 6 months I was accused of being his girlfriend... I guess what I'm saying it doesn't matter if they forget you or not They'll just latch onto something else to torture you with. It's not them, it's the disease.... at times I think it IS them and the DISEASE just makes their personality intensify.
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This is going to sound horrible,I do feel bad when I read posts on here that someones loved one has passed away, and some take it very hard, I feel bad that they feel bad,However, I also envy them,I guess I am just another "twisted sister"
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lol, whenever I read or hear on the news about how an elderly so-and-so passed away "suddenly" or "after a brief hospital stay", I think how lucky their families are. Twisted, but true.
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Joanna56 I know what you mean. I could just scream when some health care person says how lucky I am to still have my mother and then I find out theirs has been dead for years and they never had to care for them in their house, how nice for them.
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Makes sense to me, Tex, how you feel. My mother was never intentionally abusive, but even so when I find her exasperating I do the 'pretend she's somebody else's mother' thing just to help myself be kind and pleasant to her. So I can perfectly see how your life will be simpler when you're looking after, essentially, a human goldfish.

But at some point you will need to grieve, whether for your actual mother or for the other mother that you should have had and didn't. Go easy on yourself, won't you.
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My MIL is more of a shell now and it is definitely easier. Less personal in every way
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I can relate to all of these posts. When my mother passed away in January it was a blessing for both of us. We were both out of our pain. I still have to contend with my father though. he will be 90 in August. His mind is going but he is still in great physical condition for his age. If one more health care professional tells me how lucky I am that he is in such good shape and how nice that he will be around for a while. Emjo's post terrifies me. If he lives to 103 I have 13 more years.
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