Ever worry you will get Alzheimer's disease too?

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I suppose I don't have to tell anyone here that caring for my 80 year old mom with AD is consuming. I've educated myself about the disease and how to care for her. I'm 50 and don't have any obvious signs, but at times I worry. My husband's father was diagnosed at 78, but died of unrelated issues & I worry for him also. Both our parents were avid readers, did crossword puzzles, took care of their health and didn't have any risk factors. Yikes.

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Let me add that since worrying is a negative force, I try not to engage in it. I'm proactive in lieu of reactive in seeing my doctors and then I give it to our Heavenly FATHER.
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cajohnston, only early onset is hereditary. (Onset before age 70.)
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Hi Ginger, I do worry but not too much. I am 62 and about 2001 was diagnosed with a form of pre-senile 'dementia'. I had SPEC and PET scans done on my brain and found that I have 4 areas of my brain that no longer process sugar (so 'dead spots')...I have had severe migraines since I was 4 years old and my neurologist is thinking that they may have caused the damage. Two of the spots are on my frontal lobes and my entire personality changed! I went from a hard charging type A to calm, not too bright, very docile, easily-led personality. I have blackouts where time has passed and I am unaware of what has happened unless someone tells me. It can happen at anytime, even I'm not sure what has happened....I cannot count backwards from 100 by 7 or 9. BUT it appears to be stable now. I have to admit that I grieved the loss of my job and my intelligence for a long time. NOT anymore, I like me and as long as I don't get much worse I should be OK. But I have told my children if I get really bad to put me in a home and not feel guilty! I really won't know and I spent years with my dad taking care of my mom with Alz. and I would never want my children to go through that!
Blessings, Lindaz
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Absolutely! My wife and I have been caring for my mother for almost 2 years at our house. She has AL/D. I am only 55, which I believe is much too young for Alzheimer's but this past year or so I find myself having similar memory and depression issues as my Mother and it scares the s**t out of me!
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No, I don't worry. I used to worry more about disease possibilities when I was younger, say, 50s, but now I am 80 and didn't get any of the things I worried about. Somewhere in between I stopped worrying, as it only makes it more likely that the stress of worry will affect your health negatively. Father died of VaD in his early 80s, mother has VaD final stage, but is 105 and still going. One day we all will die - that is guaranteed. I do what I can to live a healthy lifestyle.
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Some kinds of dementia have a hereditary component. I think this is especially true of early-onset dementia (starts before age 65). But even when that is the case, we don't inherit all characteristics from both parents, so it is not certain that we'd have the genetic makeup for dementia even if one of them did.

I worried after my husband died of dementia. My memory was shot. I tried paying for my groceries with my library card. I did many weird things that scared me. A psychologist and a psychiatrist each assured me while this form of mourning was not common it was perfectly legitimate. I expected my emotions to be all over the place. Instead I was emotionally calm but cognitively very confused. And it did clear up.
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Yes, I always worry that. In fact I repeat five words they told my sister when she was being tested for it (she passed by the way) church, red, face, velvet and daisy. I constantly worry I am getting it as I am primary caregiver for my mom. I was told it was hereditary. Is that true?
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FelicityB I love your post! Everyone on here can learn something from it. I posted earlier telling others to look up Dr. Perlmutter but you spelled so much out. Your philosophy is the same as mine...I'm not going down without a fight!
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Answer=A friend, whose mother died of Alzheimer's said "The one thing I don't want to lose is my brain function."
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States where Medical Assisted Suicide is legal are
California, Colorado, Washington D.C., Montana, Vermont, Washington.
There are some odd conditions that I have read in some states. For example when you see the Doctor and express your wishes to be able to terminate your life they can give you a prescription for medication that will end your life but if you reach the point where you can not administer the medication yourself someone else can not give you the medication.
I am sure that some of these regulations will change.
And there is a distinct difference between Medically Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia. The Medically Assisted Suicide the person administers medication and in the case of Euthanasia medication is administered by someone else.
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