Dementia and Swallowing

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Can anyone help direct me to an article that explains why people with dementia choke on food and have problems swallowing? My uncle yells at my aunt for eating too fast, but I am sure it's part of her disease and I can't find anything on the web that would explain it easy enough for him to understand.

I'm hoping that Dr. Grimaldi can answer this for me in a manner that my 88 year old uncle could understand. His 82 year old wife has dementia and recently I have noticed that her choking while swallowing or drinking more often. My uncle gets annoyed because he thinks she's not paying attention, but I feel strongly it's part of her disease. If I'm wrong,tell me - if I'm right can you please supply an expaination that will be simple enough for my uncle to understand. I could really use some help with this one. Thanks

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We all need to know that dementia patients move towards sweet things to eat as savoury puts the taste of meltalic in mouth. I have looked after my mum 3.5 yrs she only eats kids yogurts, but loads of them.last night the muscle stopped working in her throat. Now is the hardest time of all.
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There are now more details, Scientists have taken detailed images of one of the proteins involved in Alzheimers Disease for the first time! I found the article under the Health section of www.newsgrit.com
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Jcrowley1 it might be time to start introducing more softer meals, even pureed meals.
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Mitch6666 It's time for at home hospice.
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We lost Dad when he started having trouble swallowing. He had a speech therapist, and when I asked, said he was having trouble. But I ate with him frequently, and never noticed him struggling or choking. I actually thought he just wanted more attention. He did get a cough a couple months later,and I took him to the Dr. who said it was a virus, and not pneumonia. He was wrong, and Dad had aspiration pneumonia, which quickly developed into sepsis. Lost him in 4 days.
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jcrowley, what kind of help are you looking for? Have you considered meals on wheels? She may also eat more if offered small snack sized portions throughout the day vs a few bigger meals.
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Swallowing is actually a complex activity, and it's typical that swallowing difficulties occur in brain diseases. Your doctor can refer you to a speech therapist. They are the ones that help people with dysphasia.
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My sister, who has Alzheimers, does not want a person to come into her home and help with meals and housework. She says that is for "old" people and she isn't old yet (78). Her husband tries to take care of her but she doesn't want to eat very much so we wanted someone to come in 3-4 day a week. I live nearby and can do the other days. Should we force this on her or just do the best we can helping her. She can still get angry at you so we hate to insist on this.
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I went to a Teepa Snow conference this winter - she explained why dementia patients don't want to eat or why they pull back in the later stages. One reason may be that, as the disease progresses, their vision narrows to tunnel vision, so when you try to feed them, it catches them by surprise and they pull back. She shows techniques that cue the body and mind that it is going to be fed. In this link, she shares more information on how to understand what's going on when the patient is not swallowing properly: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sNPAESrllgQ Teepa Snow is a great resource.
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Mich, instead of worrying that she will be "dehydrated and starved" understand that she will no longer feel hunger or thirst (although she may be more comfortable if you were to moisten her mouth if it is dry), in fact forcing food and drink on someone at that stage is more cruel because it causes pain and distress.
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