Bidets

Follow
Share

Bidets although common in Europe as standard bathroom equipment are a matter of great hilarity in the USA.
My husband recently asked about the cost and availability as he is incontinent of urine after a prostatectomy and an intestinal disorder that causes frequent diarrhea.
When my research began I was thinking of a freestanding unit that would take up as much room as a standard toilet and require hot and cold plumbing.
To my surprise technology has advanced and it is possible to buy a unit that fits any toilet with minimal plumbing. In fact the manufacturers say this is an easy do it yourself job as long as you have a GFI protected electrical outset nearby.
There are really cheap ones for about $300 but use only cold water. For something really satisfactory expect to pay around $1,500 For this price you will get the unit which replaces the toilet seat, an integral heater front and back sprays and a warm air dryer. There is either a remote or attached control panel and a safety feature that prevents operation unless someone is sitting on the seat. For myself I would choose the remote because it is difficult to turn around to reach the controls. It sounds like an expensive luxury and of course it is but imagine the convenience of a male relative being able to take a female to the bathroom and avoid the embarrassment of the clean up process. How about a night out ladies while hubby watches grandma? The toilet continues to be used normally by everyone else if they don't want a nice warm wash. if you do a web search you will come up with products from major manufacturers and of course the home improvement stores will be able to order for you as will your plumber.

This discussion has been closed for comment. Start a New Discussion.
Find Care & Housing
22

Comments

Show:
1 2 3
I changed my picture to show you what a faucet bidet looks like. You can still run tap water, get the temp where you want it, then flip the valve to send the water to the hose. The little shower head has a push button to control the flow. My sister broke her back so I got her one. She loves it. Her back is healed, but she still uses the faucet bidet.
(0)
Report

Most bidets are connected to both hot and cold water and a roll of paper towels nearby makes the job easier to finish - just don't flush them! Some of the bidet seats that are attached to the toilet cold water intake also include a small water heater.
I don't have any connection with any person or company who makes or sells bidets.
(1)
Report

I think cold water means different things depending on the season and where you live. Our municipal water is stored in a water tower, and in winter the only thing that keeps it from freezing solid is the volume of water constantly being used and replaced. I'm talking REALLY COLD!!! Icy spray up the backside anyone lol?
(0)
Report

I was not trying to disrespect you or any other country in any way. But seriously, cold water? That would certainly be my complaint. So okay, you use this hand sprayer but do you then drip into your undies (if you wear them)? Would there not be a need for at least a small piece of dry cloth or toilet paper to dry oneself then? I'd personally rather use a bit of toilet paper after defecating (am I blunt or what), then wet a clean wash cloth with warm to hot water and clean myself (or my mother) up, then place the used cloth in the laundry room for the next laundry load. I frankly don't think a bidet would be a bad idea, but darn it, I want some warm water if I have a choice.
(0)
Report

thanks for the clarification, bidet-man, so you're talking about a hand-held sprayer used for the privates area. I didn' t realize there were such things. That could be a helpful invention for some people. My mom just uses wetted washcloths, which is better than the rayon-based baby wipes. I can' t imagine that **just** spraying water on a dirty bottom is going to get it...well, clean, just like spraying water on a dirty window is not going to get it....clean-- you have to have some type of contact or agitation to remove the dirt particles, and then after that scrubbing action you need to rinse. So maybe the hand-held bidet is good after the wipe or "scrub" with the TP or wash cloth, at least as I can imagine my mom would do. But actually she likes her wetted washcloth just as it is (she uses it for BM, but only after removing the "dirt" with TP).
(0)
Report

Hello, I'm new here, and gosh I never ever expected to have BIDET'S be discussed. Anyhow. The thing about BIDET'S which grosses me out it not dogs or cats taking drinks, but, isn't a bidet sort of personal and private? I mean, if I have some house guests over (I have Bible Study and other group's ) and one or more of them used my bathroom, and deposited their no.1 or no.2 waste.materials onto my bidet (which is always hanging there in the toilette bowl, just aim LOW and you get a bullseye). I'm just a little cautious, hearing about E.Coli and other feces borne illness around. I love the "idea" but on the practice side of things, I would feel like this is a syringe or something I would most definitely NOT want anybody else, even my family members, to share the same toilette. So Mr.BidetsprayerMan do you have a solution (other than rigging up the Bidet to spray out Bleach Solutions)?
(0)
Report

that classy of a dog oughtta have a fountain for sure. ive drank from a toilet tank when in a bad spot. just clean h20 up there..
(0)
Report

captain, I'll always remember visiting a friend of my mom's when I was a kid, sticks with me. She was a high falutin gal with a huge French poodle. She'd let that dog drink from the toilet all the time. Cracks me up.
(0)
Report

dog fountain.. im speachless, you win, cindy. ( visual of the year )
(1)
Report

bidetking ?
(0)
Report

1 2 3
This discussion has been closed for comment. Start a New Discussion.
Related
Questions