Another Celebrity Dies From Dementia

Follow
Share

David Cassidy passed away yesterday from dementia- he was 67.

Late last week Malcolm Young, a founding member of the band AC/DC passed away from dementia- he was 64.

August 2014, Robin Williams committed suicide. The results of his autopsy showed he suffered from Lewy Bodies Dementia. Robin was 63.

County singer and actor Glen Campbell passed away August 8th 2017 - cause of death was Alzheimer’s Disease. Glen bravely announced he was suffering from Alzheimer’s in June of 2011 and was able to do a series of “Goodbye Concerts” throughout that year and 2012. Glen Campbell was admitted into a long term Alzheimer’s care facility in 2014. After living with Alzheimer’s for more than seven years, Glen Campbell passed away at age 81.

“American Top 40” radio disc jockey Casey Kasem passed away a few years ago - he was in his 80’s. Recently his daughters announced he had Lewy Bodies Dementia. Kasem's daughters reveled that their fathers death was hastened by a bedsore that had become severely infected and his body had become septic. In addition, Kasem has been improperly given liquids through his feeding tube that were not intended for this purpose- likely causing him pain. Kasem's daughters have founded an organization called Kasem Cares to help fight for and pass laws protecting the rights of the elderly.

Perhaps with more “celebrities” passing from dementia- and their families allowing this information to become public knowledge- more attention will be given to this horrible disease- and more help and support will become available to individuals suffering from dementia and their loved one caring for them.

This discussion has been closed for comment. Start a New Discussion.
Find Care & Housing
29

Comments

Show:
1 2 3
Yes, it's very sad when we find out that another celebrity has died . Even so, some details of their deaths are not made clear immediately to the public.
(0)
Report

I still don't understand the Ma'am thing and I'm from the south where Ma'am is still used, but, only for people to use with their elders. When a person who is 40 says it to a person who is 48, I want to slap them. IMO, that's just silly. After, you are 50, I think you have to consider the person and do they really want to be called Ma'am. To me, it's more for people under 21 to use for people over 50. Just my take on it and how I was brought up.
(1)
Report

My friend, Beth, was diagnosed with frontal temporal dementia in March of 2015. When I researched the symptoms, there were patterns of decline that many followed. It was explained to me that the brain was just shutting down as more and more of its functions were undermined. She lost the ability to cook, remember how to do the laundry, figure anything at all out, drive, etc. When she became incontinent and started to wander, I had found a memory care apartment in an AL place for her and her husband that provided excellent care. She got there in June of 2015, needed a wheel chair by July, needed to be fed in September and stopped being able to swallow near the end of October. By then she was receiving hospice care in her memory care apartment. So, technically, she died of starvation, but it was because the brain could no longer oversee the normal functions we have to follow to stay alive. There was no possible way to stop what was happening and her end of life wishes were very clear about when not to have steps taken to prolong her life. I was grateful for the care she received and the advice I was given about her care and what I needed to do as her POA. Not having done this before, I really needed that advice. And I noticed and appreciated how astute the staff was at noticing her needs and responding to them. I think people with alzheimers basically follow the same path near the end of life as the brain continues to be unable to do more and more of what is necessary to keep the body alive.
(2)
Report

Lol, Sunny. I can still vividly recall the first time some young whippersnapper called me Ma’am.
(2)
Report

I can hardly believe that David Cassidy was 67 years old. But, I suppose that is right. He was an adult, when he first appeared on The Partridge Family, though, he played the role of a teenager. I loved him anyway. lol

Younger and younger people are passing away. I confess to reading the obits daily now. Mainly, it's for my parents, since their friends and colleagues are dropping like flies, but, it's not just the 70 and up group. It's the twentysomethings. Drug overdoses are crazy around here. It's at least a couple a week and my parents live in a small town.  I have a friend who is in her early 50's and she's just lost her SECOND husband.  Unreal. 

The other week, I had a clerk ask me in the drug store if I got the senior discount. Well, at first I was insulted and taken aback, but, I recovered quickly and didn't even ask what their criteria for senior was....I just said proudly, "YES, please." It was 20% off too. I'll take that discount, no matter what it's called. lol
(2)
Report

Hi Veronica - - and let's not forget about the risks incurred from general anesthesia as folks age. The lovely lady doctor who anesthetized my 87 year old mother for her knee replacement with a "twilight" and epidural, said she never gives general anesthesia if it can be avoided.

My dad had true Alz. There is no proof of course, but I am personally "sure" that it was initiated by the Roto-Rooter prostate surgery he had, which is when his decline so obviously started.

I have enough experience with "other" dementias to make the claim - - two aunts had alcohol dementia, my close friend's brother had infarct dementia, my own brother-in-law had FTD and my mother ended with drug-induced dementia from an over-burden of anticholinergic medication (before the problem was understood).
(1)
Report

Moecam- isn’t that the truth!

I started receiving membership forms from AARP around age 50.

I received the dubious honor of qualifying for “senior shopping” discount days just this year - I am 55.

My government- in their infinite wisdom has raised the age to 67 for when I’ll be allowed to collect my full Social Security benefits.

My body and energy level feels like I’m 1000 years old. Yet in my head - I still feel like I’m in my 30’s.

So when is it, exactly- when one is old?
(3)
Report

Much stems from the old belief [supported by many churches] that bad things happen to bad people - your sickness was a result of your sins - that's why many wouldn't talk about cancer, dementia. TB & more because they didn't want to be classified as sinners -

It is starting to change but most keep it quiet which is partly rooted in that old notion that if you're ill then you did something 'wrong' - think about 150 years ago that many whould be put in jail & probably died there with little to no help because they were 'peculiar' but it could still be happening

Getting elder rights is a good idea but how do you define 'elder' that is the problem - will that make another hurdle for those trying to get help for someone unwilling to accept that they need help? - a new can of worms!
(1)
Report

I don’t know - it’s true that it’s usually something else that causes the death in the end but - at least to me - it’s kind of Potato/PaTATo.

Technically, my mother died from malnutrition- but it was her loss of skill and memory that kept her from eating and swallowing...
(2)
Report

Rosemary44,
I've wondered the same thing and have done a lot of research on it. Most doctors don't know much about it at all. I'm no expert, but, based on what I've read, the condition like Alzheimers can cause the death, although, it's often some underlying condition like heart failure, stroke, etc. Typically, the death from Alzheimers is the loss of critical brain functions. I take it to mean that the patient's brain damage prevents them from breathing, regulating body temperature, etc. I"m going to PM you a link that I found helpful, since we are not supposed to post links on the thread.
(1)
Report

1 2 3
This discussion has been closed for comment. Start a New Discussion.
Related
Questions