A Lesson in Love


1 Corinthians 13:4–8a

Love is patient, love is kind; love does not envy or boast; it is not arrogant or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful; it does not rejoice at wrongdoing, but rejoices with the truth. Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things. Love never ends.

Since age 58 mom has had dementia; she is now 74.

Her battle has been 16 years long, and she's still fighting. Mom is patient.

When mom did not understand how dangerous it was to pick up a stranger while lost in the winter's cold, she gave up her coat so the stranger would be warm. Mom is kind.

Mom has accepted her disease as hers. Mom does not envy or boast.

Mom is grateful for the care she receives from her daughters, nurses, doctors and aids. Mom is not arrogant or rude.

During mom's journey there have been many ups and downs. Mom rides the roller coaster of dementia with grace and style. As her disease progressed, Mom had to be moved for her own safety. This kind of change is difficult on dementia patients. Mom does not insist on her own way, she is not irritable or resentful.

Upon her diagnosis, mom insisted on placement. She did not want to "burden" her children. Mom had the option to live with her children, but knew she was very sick and stood firm. This was a most unselfish act. Mom does not rejoice at wrongdoing, but rejoices with the truth.

Mom bears the brunt of this dreadful disease. Despite her memory loss, she recites the Lord's Prayer, Mom believes. She continues to fight every day; mom hopes and refuses to give up.

Day in and day out mom endures the pain of living with dementia. Mom asks for nothing, she is bound to a wheelchair, has forgotten how to dress, how to read, how to eat, even has difficulty swallowing, yet her love remains because love is not a memory.

When she sees her children it is obvious how much she loves them. Her face lights up, she is able to put a few words together such as "Thank you, you are beautiful, and I love you."

Mom's love is endless.

Growing up in a close family, Michele DeSocio learned about the power of love at a very young age and still maintains that she is happiest when with her loved ones. In 1999, she became caregiver to her mom Jean DelCampo. Michele found her voice as an advocate volunteering for Memory People, an online support and awareness group for dementia.

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Your mom is a very unique person. Despite the dementia, her true personality is still intact. I'm glad that this is so.
Aw, This brings back some great memories of my own Mom. She also suffered from dementia. It was a slow decline, but like your mom she was a fighter. She has long since passed. I still miss her.
Beautiful way of telling your story,...thank you!