Share
11
Print Email

Take Dementia Out With the Trash: Daily Chores May Prevent Cognitive Decline

Text Size: - +

Getting an elderly person to be active by having them help with daily chores like doing the dishes, cleaning the bathroom, and folding laundry might just help prevent them from developing dementia, according to a study reported by HealthDay.com.

Researchers from the University of Florida gave 200 people, with an average age of 75, chemically modified water to drink that would help them measure each person's daily caloric output. They then divided the seniors up into three separate groups based on how much energy they used.

It came as no surprise to the researchers that the most active group, comprised of people that burned 1,000 calories a day on average, were more likely to have nimbler minds. In fact, they found that even five years later, the people in the highest activity bracket had a 91% reduction in risk for cognitive decline.

The intriguing finding was that the elderly people who were expending the most calories weren't doing it by working out more—they were just busier. Only 18% of the people in the 1,000 calorie group said that they engaged in regular, energetic exercise.

The study authors say that moving around, doing chores and performing caregiving tasks was the reason that group had such a diminished risk.

Their activity was spread throughout the day instead of being confined to a 30 to 45 minute window. This helped them use more calories and decrease their risk for dementia.

This study was published in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

 
Read more about: cognitive decline, dementia
 






Free Helpful Guides

Home Care Guide
How to find, hire and manage home care.
Get the home care guide ›
Alzheimer’s Care Guide
Learn from elder care experts, caregivers and patients.
Get your care guide ›
Caregivers' Survival Guide:
Everything you need to care
for an elderly family member.
Get the caregivers' guide ›
 
FIND HOUSING AND CARE




 
DOWNLOAD FREE RESOURCES
Everything you need to care for
an elderly family member.
Download your eBook ›
How to find, hire and
manage home care.
Get the home care guide ›
GET ANSWERS
140 characters left

©2014 AgingCare, LLC All rights reserved.  About Us  |  Advertise with Us  |  Sitemap

 

The material of this web site is provided for informational purposes only. AgingCare.com does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment;
or legal, financial or any other professional services advice. Use of this site is subject to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.